Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
CLICK HERE to see new posts in last 24 hours
Mark all forums read
Welcome to Locate and Cement - Plastic Model Kit Review, Advice and Exchange of ideas.. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Protar 1/9 1957 DKW 350 3 cylinder racer.; A make of bike kit I lusted after as a youth
Topic Started: Sep 18 2017, 09:08 AM (828 Views)
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Many years ago, when I were a lad, I used to pay occasional visits to the original Hannent's model shop in Lowerstoft, but in those days my pocket money would never run to the purchase of any of the Protar bike or car kits which had a very good reputation.

Last year at the Ellesmere Model Show, I noticed that the guy manning the Ellesmere Model Boat Club display opposite the AMSIG table had a few kits for sale - turns out they were leftover stock from when he closed down his model shop, and, as they had been acting as 'loft insulation' for some time, he had decided to offload them as he figured he would never get round to building them himslef.

Among them was this Protar bike kit and it seemed like a good opportunity, especially as we managed to negotiate a good price - certainly a fraction of what they seem to be advertised for on ebay - though they do not seem to come up for sale very often, which might explain the exhorbitant prices asked.

I have seen a few Protar bike kits displayed at shows, mainly the early Norton/AJS/Matchless big singles, but the DKW is a somewhat unusual subject, being an East German three cylinder two-stroke with a full 'dustbin' fairing.

Although the kit appears to have been around since the 1960's, this boxing is from much later, at least the late 1980's judging from the kit list on the side of the box.

The box art - somewhat colourful and unusual, with just an end plate showing details of the actual model.
Posted Image
Posted Image

The sprues - quite a lot of parts in several colours of plastic, including a large sprue of 'chromed' parts, most of which should probably not really be chrome, as the real thing was built as a 'light weight' using lots of alloy - the whole thing alledgedly had a dry weight of about 180lb.
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Also includes a bag of tubing for cables, etc. and some screws for assembly.
Rubber tyres are included, as it a rubber drive chain! A big bubble screen is supplied, mared slightly by having the part no moulded into the plastic near the top edge.
Posted Image

One intriguing aspect is that the kit includes pistons, con-rods and a crank-shaft, I guess to allow the option of depicting the engine as a cut-away, as is shown on the box art.

The instructions consist of several photocopied sheets of line drawings, but at first glance they look adequate to build the kit.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

A set of decals are supplied for the dustbin fairing, tank and seat, but it appears to be necessary to mask and spray some additional areas to replicate the box-art version, which seems to depict a modern museum example, which looks to be a much tidied up version of the bikes as they raced in period, photos of which depict bare metal tank and fairing complete with panel beating marks.

Posted Image

Looking forward to the build - having spent the last year trying to summon up the courage...
A trawl of the web brings up a few images of the real thing, mainly the museum example, but also some from the period when it was raced round Europe, including at the IOM TT.
I plan to try and depict it 'in-period', as it looks as if that will be a more interesting challenge - having never tried to depict an un-painted, hand-formed alloy fuel tank before...

As this kit seems a better fit to L&C than the other forums I frequent, I will use L&C as the main thread for the build.
Edited by IanW, Sep 18 2017, 09:11 AM.
Goto Top
 
peebeep
Member Avatar
Lots Of Trouble Usually Serious
[ *  *  * ]
I remember the Protar kits being reviewed from the late sixties through the seventies and they always looked like the bees knees. They were far too exotic for my local shops and apart from lacking the means, mail order was not my thing in those days. Looking forward to this thread developing, thanks for posting.
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Just made a start on it.

As this version of the kit probably dates from the late 80's or 90's it appears that the quality of the moulds has deteriorated somewhat over the 20-30 years since they were created, as there are fairly prominent mould lines on some parts and a bit of misalignment between the mould halves in some places - quite a lot on the frame as shown below, but I think the worst of it will be hidden by the fuel tank and seat base.

Posted Image

Posted Image

I seem to recall that the original Protar 50/60's kits used to contain lots of small metal screws for assembly, but most of these have been replaced by plastic 'bolts', which the instruction sheets state need to be either glued in place or 'riveted over' using a heated blade.

Posted Image

I will be going with using Mek-Pak or similar, as I figure I might cause damage with a hot blade.

First task has been to clean up the worst of the mould lines on the two halves of the tube frame, ready for assembly - at least the plastic is soft enough to scrape the seams back without a great deal of effort.

One of the bolts temporarily in place in the frame - this one will be hidden beneath the fuel tank - others will need more gentle handling as they will be visible.

Posted Image

Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Initial work on the frame and swinging arm.

Frame is in two halves which are designed to be screwed together at either end of the single top tube using the plastic bolts. After dry fitting the parts I decided to adopt the following strategy to try and ensure I got the frame alignment correct, especially around the headstock.

I found a suitably size twist drill to match the front fork pivot tube diameter and used this to ensure the two halves were aligned whilst applying some Mek-Pak and leaving it to cure.

Another drill bit was fitted between the holes for the swinging arm bolt and used to help check that rest of the frame was algned squarely. As the two halves of the rear end of the top tube was reasonably well aligned, these were joined using more Mek-Pak and clamped to cure. I didn't bother using the plastic bolts as the holes in the two halves were slightly misaligned.

Posted Image

The rear swinging arm is in three parts, the two sides and a small plate that fits inside the pivot end to help align the two side arms.
A couple of drill bits were used to ensure that two ends of the arms were parallel - a little bit of 'persuasion' being required to get there.

Posted Image

I also made a start on the engine/gearbox.
The engine configuration is somewhat unique, being basically a V3 air cooled two stroke.

Having done some research it appears that in order to produce a machine for the 350 class they derived the new engine from their existing succesful 250 parallel twin.
Rather than taking the obvious routes of either enlarging the existing twin (probably because the resultant increased piston/conrod size/weight would reduce the revability of the engine), or adding a third cylinder to make a parallel triple (width and cooling difficulties being detrimental in this case), they decided to add a third cylinder between the existing two but at a different angle so as to avoid too much additional width.

Posted Image

The resulting high-pitched sound of this engine configuration led to the bike getting the nickname of the 'singing saw'.

Seems to have been reasonably successful as the bike managed to finish 3rd in 1955 and =2nd in 1956 350 World Championship.

Goto Top
 
Grant
Member Avatar
Italian correspondent
[ *  *  * ]
This looks like an interesting little project. Good luck.
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
About time I updated this thread, having been working on it sporadically over the last few weeks.

Made a start by stripping the chrome off the bright parts - out with the jar of caustic soda solution.
Some of the parts required quite a long soak, as for some reason the chrome appeared to be much more tenacious on one side compared to the other.

I made a start on repainting the 'chromed' parts with a variety of appropriate shades of metallic paints, Humbrol MetalCote and Vallejo Model Air.

Although it doesn't show up too well in these photos, the wheels were done with 3 shades of MetalCote. Flat Aluminium for the hubs, Polished Aluminium for the rims and Polished Steel for the spokes.
Posted Image

Posted Image

One of the prominent parts of the original is the fuel tank, which in the kit is moulded in two parts.
Posted Image

It might be thought that the placing of the joint between the parts could be a bit problematic, but in fact the original had such a seam and the welding was a very prominent feature.
Posted Image

The instructions suggest trying to replicate the welds using paint, although the decal sheet provides an alternative solution, but it is not particularly convincing. I am planning to try to build up the weld pattern using Galleria acrylic matte medium mixed with suitable acrylic paints.
The other feature of the tank is the hammer marks from the panel beaters forming of the tank - they apparently did not bother to try achieve a smooth polished surface as the tanks were often fabricated in the back of the truck overnight at the tracks, once they had checked the fuel consumption during practice and from that calculated the size of tank required to carry just enough fuel, high revving two-stroke engines being notoriously heavy on fuel.

Not sure exactly how I am going to try depicting this, but I have been playing around with some recently aquired Mr Metal paints.
This is the first attempt. still very much WIP.
Posted Image

Built up the swinging arm front forks, which actually work as per the originals.
Posted Image

One time consuming task was fettling the numerous plastic bolts that used to hold the parts together.
Posted Image

Each one needs to be carefully removed from the sprue in order to not distort the bolt head when attempting to remove any remaining sprue gate.
Devised the following technique to help with this.
Drilled a suitable diameter hole in a piece of wood, inserted the bolt and trimmed off any surplus plastic and inserted into holes in some cardboard to try and keep them away from the dreaded Carpet Monster.
Posted Image

The heads of the bolts were then painted with Mr Metal Stainless Steel and when dry returned to the block to be polished with a cotton bud.
Posted Image

I must admit that after that last task the enthusiasm was waning slightly...
Goto Top
 
peebeep
Member Avatar
Lots Of Trouble Usually Serious
[ *  *  * ]
:like:
Goto Top
 
thomasweir
Member
[ *  * ]
Good work Ian :thumbsup:
Goto Top
 
Jelly071
Member Avatar
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
a great start
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Back to this project after a couple of diversions.

I have been working on it over the last couple of months but somehow not got round to posting anything.

An initial cumulative update of progress - luckily I had been taking some photos as I went on.

Spent quite a lot of time cleaning up the myriad of parts prior to painting. As many of these are very small, they need to be removed from the sprues to allow the gate tags to be cleaned up.
They then need some method of securing them for painting - I tend to use cocktail sticks pocked into any suitable orifice, drilling suitable hidden holes if none are present. The sticks are then stuck into blocks of expanded polystyrene

As this is another boring repetative process I also started working on the rather large 'dustbin' fairing - this is quite heavy as it is moulded in quite thick plastic and is designed to be secured by two screws passed through bosses on the side panels into housings on the frame, which unfortunatly leaves two rather prominent holes in the outside of the fairing, although these could be covered by the competition number decals.

Posted Image

As the fairing covers up quite a lot of the detail in the kit I have been looking at devising a fixing method that allows the fairing to be removed and replaced if required.

It looks like on the real thing the fairing was slid into place on forward-facing horizontal bars and then secured by clips. Not sure if I can replicate this but decided to get rid of the large screw boss on the inside of the fairing sides and and fill the external holes.

I had a go at reducing the thickness of the plastic to reduce the weight by scraping/filing down the insides.

I also opened up the slots for the air intakes on each side - a before and after shot

Posted Image

The other prominent feature of these machines was the large fuel tank - racing two-stroke engines being somewhat fuel hungry. Photos of the originals show that these where produced to be functional rather than asthetically pleasing and hence I have been playing around with trying to replicate the hammered alloy finish.

I soon abandoned the original idea of trying to actually hammer the surface as the plastic is quite brittle and it risks doing irretrivable damage.

Continued playing with the Mr Color metalics - quite impressed with the results.

They are quite thin and need to be stirred well as the pigment does tend to precipitate out.

I found the best way to use them was to decant some well stirred paint into small eye-dropper bottles, which makes it easier to shake up and also deliver small amounts into the airbrush cup.
I found them better to apply by airbrush rather than by brush, but that might be just me.
They airbrush on easily, using a lowish air pressure and dry quickly as they are solvent based.
One thing to note is that do dry quickly in the airbrush, hence the use of the eye dropper to only use the minumum required. It is also necessary to flush out the airbrush as soon as you finish spraying as the pigment does tend to clog the nozzle if left too long, particularly if you are using a fine nozzle/needle. I found that meths is quite a good/cheap flushing agent for this paint.

Once dry, the paint can be buffed up to get the required effect - the Aluminium really does polish up quite well as can be seen here, although the effect does require the underlying surface to be very smooth as every flaw does show through.

Before and after buffing.

Posted Image Posted Image

To try and get the hammer effect I tried the following experiment on the seat fairing.

Applied Mr Colour Aluminium, allowed it to dry and buffed it up, then stippled on spots of Mr Colour Iron and Stainless with an old cut down paintbrush, left it to dry out and then applied a mist coat of Aluminium. When buffed up it gave the following results, which I think looks quite effective.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Encouraged by this I moved onto the tank. Applied some Galleria Matt Medium with a small glass decorating kit bottle/nozzle to cfeate the weld line along the sides of the tank - This needed several applications to build up the depth. I then finished the welds off with a mixture of Airfix acrylic Silver from a starter kit mini-pot and Matt Medium.

Then repeated the process used on the seat but this time did not buff up the initial coat prior to adding the spots. Also ommited the final mist coat.

Posted Image

After buffing.

Posted Image

Quite pleased with the effect, but one problem I found with the Mr Colour Metals is that they are not particularly durable, they tend to wear off quite easily with over-handling. Maybe they need a coat of varnish, but not sure how it will effect the finish.

Not sure if I will repeat this technique on the fairing or try something else.
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Next retrograde progress installment.

After a lot of time had been spent preparing and painting the myriad of components a start was made on assembly.

The main components went together fairly easily but thought had to be given as to how the pipes and cables would be attached.

The kit is supplied with a range of assorted tubing, both black and clear, but to my mind most of it is somewhat oversize. The piping is designed to be installed by sliding the ends over moulded spigots which are sized to fit the supplied tubing.

I decided that I would try and use more suitably scaled tubing, but this of course will not fit over the spigots. As a result I spent quite a lot of time drilling out the ends of each spigot to either take the tubing itself, or, for the thicker piping, drilling and inserting a length of wire over which the tubing will fit. Drilling the numerous holes was quite a slow process, especially given the somewhat small size of parts that had to be drilled. Broke quite a few .3 and .4 mm drill bits in the process.

The instruction sheet indicates the length of each of the pipes/wires required but these do seem to be fairly rough estimates, so it was very much a trial and error process to get them to look right when installed.

Given the number of pipes required - for example the fuel system requires 4 pipes from tank to the 2 float chambers and then 3 pipes from these to the carburettors, this was again a somewhat tedious process, especially as most of these pipes have to negotiate fairly tight curves in somewhat cramped spaces. Using the thinnest clear piping I could find in the spares box, I think leftover from a Tamiya 1/12 car kit, I had to try and find a way of preventing this from kinking, which it was very prone to do, especially as it is probably 30-40 years old and had aged-hardened somewhat.
After quite a bit of trial, and even more error, the eventual method used was as follows.

A length of fine wire was pushed along the pipe, trying to avoid poking it through the sidewalls! The pipe/wire was then bent to the required shape and then dipped into hot water for a few seconds. When it had cooled down the wire was pulled out, hopefully leaving the pipe holding its shape.

Posted Image

Posted Image

This made it somewhat easier to install

Posted Image

Given all the cables/pipe work on the kit - there are 10 cables running to the handlebars alone - I somewhat depleted the spares box of suitable thin plastic covered wire, hence the use of some unorthodox colours for some cable runs. Note I found it better to remove the wire from the centre of those cables that had to remain flexible, eg those that run to the handlebars.

Eventually managed to get all the parts prepared and assembled, apart from the fairing.

Posted Image

I was also working on the fairing as a diversion from all the intricate work.

Having thinned down the plastic to try and reduce the weight as much as possible, I added a pair of tubes inside the fairing to locate onto the supports I had added to the frame - these roughly match those on the limited photo evidence of the real thing that I have managed to unearth. In addition some brackets were added to help spread the load onto a pair of lower bars - dummy rivets from sewing pins were also added.

Posted Image

Posted Image

The two halfs of the fairing were than glued together. Not sure why the front end of the two halfs have this very prominent seam - maybe the mould has been modified at some time, it almost looks like as if a strip has been added to each half to widen the fairing or maybe to remair some damage.

Posted Image

The first of several applications of Vallejo filler to eradicate the canyon.

Posted Image

Work is ongoing on the fairing.
Goto Top
 
Grant
Member Avatar
Italian correspondent
[ *  *  * ]
The 'hammer' effect has turned out very well. Looking great.
Goto Top
 
peebeep
Member Avatar
Lots Of Trouble Usually Serious
[ *  *  * ]
That's really coming on, concur with Grant the seat fairing and tank are looking the biz.

I remember reading the reviews in Scale Models whenever the Protar kits were released, never bought any (too skint back in those days!). Nearly bought one of the Manx Nortons when italeri recently released it.
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Thanks for the comments - glad you like it.

It is only when assembled that you realise how big the kit is - with the fairing installed it is 9" long. It is also quite heavy, which does give some concerns as to how to transport and display it at shows. A stand is supplied but unless you glue it to the footrests it does not really hold it steady. At present the bike is wired to the stand as a temporary measure.

As those who have seen my work might have guessed, I sometimes have this irrational urge to try and bring a sense of movement into some of my builds.

I figured that adding a seated rider might exacerbate the display problems but whilst looking at period photos of bikes of this era I remembered that in those days the bikes were bump started off the grid by the rider pushing the bike to gain enough speed to drop the clutch and (hopefully) turn the engine over fast enough to get it started and tghen solve the problem of jumping onto the seat before the bike takes off. I decided to explore this avenue on the grounds that a rider running alongside the bike might help to support it.

A seach of the internet failed to find any 1/9 scale riders (no surprises there), or any suitable figures that might form a basis for one, and a search of the 'toy' boxes in local charity shops also failed to turn anything up, so I decided to try and scratch build my own.

I did manage to find an old Tamiya 1/12 'Emerson Fittipaldi' figure in the stash and decided to try and scale this up to 1/9th.

Using the same basic method as for my Mr Toad, I made up a rough skeleton from two lengths of U-shaped copper wire from old ring mains cable and fixed them together using a glue gun.
For Mr Toad I used the glue gun to build up the main body shape but decided this would be -
a - heavy,
b - expensive,
c - laborious,
d - prone to burnt fingers - I know because I tried!

I figured that what was needed was something much lighter and managed to find some high density polystyrene foam packaging which was roughly cut to shape and glued over the wire.

Posted Image

The wire was then bent to shape to fit the figure to bike - one advantage of the foam over glue being it is much easier to bend to shape.

Posted Image

Posted Image

The foam was then roughly carved to shape - tried experimenting with wrapping one arm in strips of masking tape to improve the shape, then coating it in a layer of Matt Medium. Not sure if I will continue with this aspect as it tended to bulk out the arm too much.

Posted Image

Posted Image

An alternative approach was to coat the foam in Galleria Heavy Carvable Modelling Paste which, when dry, can be carved/filed to shape. This also has the advantage that after covering the model in clingfilm the still wet pasted figure could be pushed against the tank/seat to try and represent the rider bracing his body against the bike - thats the plan anyway.

Posted Image

I think the figure might be a bit small, but there again most 'bike riders are quite small/lightweight, and as this was an East German rider from the 1950's, he was probably somewaht shorter/thinner than the general population. I therefore decided not to attempt to make it any bigger, as there is not a great deal of room inside the fairing for his arms as it is.

Posted Image

Next task was to try and produce the riders hand and head. For the hands I took Oyumaru moulds from the Fittipaldi figure and moulded new hands from Milliput. Also took a mould of the face as a starting point. Decided not to try and scale the hands up as they only just fit the handlebar grips without fouling the inside of the fairing.

Next task is to come up with a method of depicting the 'pudding basin' crash helmet used it this era - not sure of my ability to create a convincing ball shape from Milliput.

Goto Top
 
Grant
Member Avatar
Italian correspondent
[ *  *  * ]
A bit of sculpting - now there is a brave man!
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Or maybe just foolish!
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Thanks for the comments.

Spent some more time on the rider.

Gradually getting the pose to look more natural, bulding up the surface with the heavy modelling paste.

Also worked on the riders head and helmet.

The face and left hand came out ok but I need to remake the mould for the right hand.

Posted Image

Managed to find a method to make the helmet. Found on old allow cigar tube with a domed end just about the right size, so cut the end off, smeared Vaseline round the inside and lined it with Milliput. When that had cured the helment came out easily enough.

Posted Image

The inside of the tube end was not actually spherical but was fairly easy to sand down.

Posted Image

Posted Image

The depth of the bowl was sanded down and the inside edge thinned down.

Posted Image

The helmet fits the head quite well.

Posted Image

Posted Image

It still needs some adjustment to get it right, but I think I amd getting there.

Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
A bit more progress.

Have been working on the fairing, going for a similar hand finished effect as to that on the tank.

The next task was to add the green paintwork on the front and sides of the fairing.

The fairing has very very faintly moulded lines delineating the edges of the paintwork, and before spraying the plastic with the Mr Colors paints I took a tracing of them, just as well as they dissapeared once the paint was applied.

Took most of a day to mask up and spray the fairing - really difficult doing the compound curves on the front. I can vouch for the efficacy of the Tamiya masking tape designed for curves.
Once masked I added a thin coat of Tamiya Gloss Green. Managed to get the masking tape off without damaging the metalic finish, well nothing that a quick rub over with S&J polishing powder wouldn't fix, though when the tape was removed there seemed to be quite a lot of metallic finish on the adhesive.
Posted Image

Posted Image

Next task was the decals - I used a spare piece of decal to see how well it would adhere to the mettalic paint - not very well being the answer. As a result I resorted to applying a brushed coat of Klear - which luckily had very little effect on the metal finish.

The race no decals on the sides of the fairing went on really well.
Posted Image

The front plate decal is supplied as part of a broad white stripe - I decided to cut the stripe off for two reasons - a) the period photos I have found do not depict a stripe and b) part of the supplied decal had been damaged by contact with one of the wheel rims over the years of storage so the smaller the decal the smaller the visible damage. The main problem with this decal is that it has to be applied to a compound curve and unfortunately the decal material does not seem be softened by MicroSol products and hence was not capable of stretching to conform to the dome, resulting in the edges puckering up. I had to take a sharp blade to the ridges and was then able to smooth the decal down, luckily the decal material is quite thin and the overlaps are not too prominent.
Posted Image

Will need a slight touch up with white paint.

Also been working on the rather large bubble screen. I spent quite a lot of time trying to eliminate the rather unfortunate part-no cast into the top edge of the bubble screen. Fortunately it was cast in relief, so it was possible to (almost) cut/file it down - unfortunately it was cast into the concave underside of the plastic, so trimming it down did result in plenty of scratches in the surrounding plastic. I then had to spend quite a lot of time trying to eliminate these using gradularly finer grades of FLEX-I-FILE mylar polishing sheets and finishing with the traditional 'MK1 digit and toothpaste'. Managed to remove enough of the scratches for it to at least look reasonable from a distance.
Posted Image

A shot of the screen test fitted in place.
Posted Image

I need to find a method of securing the screen to the fairing - the parts just butt together and the joint faces are quite narrow and will be visible, so I need to find an sdhesive that will not damage/cloud the clear plastic - will try Krystal Klear - if the 30 year old bottle has not dried up.

Also been working on the rider, gradually refining the shape of the torso and attempting to get a reasonable rendition of the black leathers. Next task on this will be trying to depict the wrinkles and stretched folds of the leather - have found quite a lot of on-line period photos - just need to work out the best way of depicting them.
Posted Image

Posted Image

Some progress on the rider's head and helmet - quite pleased with how the leather sides and chin straps are coming along but still not convinced the head looks big enough in relation to the rest of the body.
Posted Image Posted Image

Now working on making a set of goggles.


Edited by IanW, Feb 11 2018, 06:46 AM.
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Next task was to make a suitable base.

After a search of the local charity shops I managed to find a suitably sized picture frame for 1.50.

Replaced the glass with several layers of corrugated cardboard, the aim being to provide a suitable depth into which to sink any supports required to hold the bike in place.

Posted Image

Current idea is to have two pins sticking up from the base locating into holes in the tyres and one wire from the base into each boot.

For the tarmac I used some thin cork sheet that ColinM kindly donated to me some time back - I found it does a good imitation of tarmac when painted with matt grey paint. This was glued onto another sheet of thin card to make it flat and rigid and then painted with some Revell Dust Grey (77).

Posted Image

The tarmac temporarily laid in place to check the effect - think it will do.

Posted Image

I tried the ancient Krystal Klear as an adhesive for the screen - seems to have be holding it in place so far!

Posted Image
Goto Top
 
IanW
Advanced Member
[ *  *  * ]
Main work left is to finish the rider. I have been struggling to depict the folds and seams in the leathers using the acrylic pastes and gels as it is very difficult to get a stiff enough surface with the uncured material to achieve the effect - tried covering the surface with cling film and using that to hold the folds in place as the material dries, but not very successful as the cling film stops the air getting in/water getting out and hence slows down the curing process.
Even if you do leave it long enough to cure, when the CF is pulled off it often reveals small bubble holes which tend to ruin the 'leather' effect.

As an alternative I have now commenced applying a very thin layer of Milliput, which has the advantage that it is easier to manipulate into folds and, unlike the acrylics, can be sanded down if necessary. It can also been smoothed down with a wet finger as required.

Only concern is whether or not it will adhere to the underlying surface - will leave it to cure overnight and see.

Posted Image

Posted Image
Edited by IanW, Feb 16 2018, 05:21 PM.
Goto Top
 
Go to Next Page
« Previous Topic · Work in Progress Vehicles · Next Topic »

Friends of Locate & Cement
Skin created by Nikku from Zathyus Networks Resources