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Earthquake!!
Topic Started: Oct 17 2006, 05:19 PM (207 Views)
Cody
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Time for Change
There apparently has been an earthquake about 135 miles from Anchorage AK.


2006-10-17 14:37 REVISED: (Ml 6.0) CENTRAL ALASKA 63.0 -150.8

USGS ENS <ens@usgs.gov> to me
More options 3:16 pm (0 minutes ago)

== PRELIMINARY EARTHQUAKE REPORT ==

***This event has been revised.


Region: CENTRAL ALASKA
Geographic coordinates: 62.991N, 150.795W
Magnitude: 6.0 Ml
Depth: 50 km
Universal Time (UTC): 17 Oct 2006 14:37:51
Time near the Epicenter: 17 Oct 2006 06:37:51
Local time in your area: 17 Oct 2006 14:37:51

Location with respect to nearby cities:
68 km (42 miles) N (358 degrees) of Petersville, AK
73 km (45 miles) NNW (330 degrees) of Chase, AK
79 km (49 miles) NNW (344 degrees) of Trapper Creek, AK
207 km (129 miles) NNW (345 degrees) of Anchorage, AK


ADDITIONAL EARTHQUAKE PARAMETERS
________________________________
event ID : AK 00071310

This is a computer-generated message and has not yet been reviewed by a
seismologist.
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Cody
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This quake has apparently been downgraded to a 5.2. This was originally called a 4.9, then a 5.7 then a 6 and then back down to 5.2. Unless there has been more than one earthquake, the seismographs must have been going crazy at the USGS. :D
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Ohio Quakes Tied To Fracking

From Science at msnbc.com

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Geologists say Ohio quakes directly tied to fracking
Process uses deep wells in rock to dispose of liquid wastes during natural gas drilling

By Eric Niiler
updated 1/6/2012 4:53:16 PM ET

Recent earthquakes in Ohio and Oklahoma have been directly linked to deep wells used to dispose of liquid wastes for hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" of natural gas, according to geological experts.
And they expect more earthquakes to come as the industry continues to expand across the eastern United States.
A boom in gas production using hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" of natural gas has played a role in decreasing U.S. dependence on foreign oil and coal and helped cut energy prices, but evidence is mounting that the process may come at a price.

"To the extent that our nation wants to become independent of meeting its energy needs in the coming years, the increased earthquakes are going to go along with that," said Art McGarr, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif. "The problems are only going to grow in the future."
State officials shut down all drilling around a brine-injection well after a magnitude-4.0 quake rumbled through the Youngstown, Ohio, on New Year's Eve day. That was the 11th earthquake in 2011 in the region, which is not considered seismically active. Experts are also investigating a magnitude-5.6 earthquake east of Oklahoma City that has been linked to gas drilling there, McGarr said.
"It's reasonably clear that these Youngstown earthquakes are being caused by the disposal well activities," McGarr said. "The earthquakes started in March of last year. That's about the same period that the major injection activities started."

A team of investigators from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has been trying to figure out the connection between the earthquakes and the injection well, which takes waste fluids from nearby fracking operations, for the past few months. John Armbruster, a seismologist on the team, said the wells trigger quakes that are already poised to occur.
Armbruster compared the disposal well to a hydraulic jack that is slowly splitting an underground fault.
The well "is forcing the two sides apart and it starts to slip," Armbruster said. "The earthquake is the slip."
At least 177 similar disposal wells are located throughout Ohio, and Armbruster says it will take a while for the pressure from the fracking fluids to disperse into the earth.

During fracking, high-pressure water and chemicals are forced into shale rock to force out natural gas. Supporters say it's an efficient way to tap into vast petroleum resources that lay under the Eastern United States. Homeowners and environmental groups in Pennsylvania have complained that fracking fluids have poisoned underground drinking water supplies in some areas. New York officials are considering whether to allow fracking in the Marcellus and Utica shale despots that lie underneath the state.
Armbruster said a disposal well in the western Finger Lakes area of New York was shut down in 2001 because of earthquakes. He says that he's working on a model to predict which areas near drilling sites will be susceptible to earthquakes, although there's still no way to accurately predict their size and strength.
"When you operate one of these wells, you have to monitor it more carefully and see when it begins to cause earthquakes," Armbruster said. "If you shut it down, you are much more likely to prevent a damaging earthquake that would come later."

So far, the earthquakes linked to drilling operations have been relatively minor. Both experts said they don't have enough data yet to know whether the industrial drilling could spawn more destructive ones.
© 2012 Discovery Channel



Edited by Skookum, Sep 16 2015, 08:13 PM.
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Sean_
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I'm not surprised with this.
Don't think about all those things you fear. Just be glad to be here.

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Skookum
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So then, is SOMEONE going to put a stop to this frackin' crap?



.......I know......silly question... :rolleyes: :mallet:
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Magnitude-6.2 Earthquake Shakes Acapulco, Mexico

By Becky Oskin, Staff Writer | August 21, 2013 11:04am ET
source article
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A magnitude-6.2 earthquake struck Mexico's Pacific coast today (Aug. 21), shaking buildings in the resort town of Acapulco. The quake was felt as far inland as Mexico City. The temblor hit at 7:38 a.m. local time (8:38 a.m. ET), about 60 miles (100 kilometers) east of Acapulco. The earthquake was centered at a depth of about 18 miles (30 km), initial reports estimate. A magnitude-5.3 aftershock followed 24 minutes after the initial temblor, according to the United States Geological Survey.

No major injuries or damage have been reported in Mexico City, where an earthquake early warning system prompted building evacuations, according to the Associated Press. Strong shaking was reported in Acapulco. Schools have been closed for the day. Building walls cracked in Acapulco, damage was reported at three hospitals, and a cement gate at a military building collapsed, according to news reports.
Picture of USGS map in article.
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Here ya go Gamer

link


Mar 30, 6:32 PM EDT

MAGNITUDE-4.8 EARTHQUAKE SHAKES YELLOWSTONE PARK

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) -- The U.S. Geological Survey says the magnitude-4.8 earthquake that shook northern Yellowstone National Park is the strongest there since 1980.

But the Sunday quake was still considered relatively light, and its location didn't raise concerns about the park's supervolcano, which experts say has the potential to erupt with a force about 2,000 times the size of Mount St. Helens and would have worldwide effects.
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Monday Quake Makes Top 8 Of Largest Shakers In U.S. History

One of the largest earthquakes to hit the U.S. since 1965 jolted the Aleutian Islands Monday afternoon.

The U.S. Geological Survey now puts the earthquake at 7.9 in magnitude. It was centered about 13 miles southeast of Little Sitkin Island and caused more than 12 major aftershocks.

The quake was recorded at a depth of nearly 70 miles, which limited the threat of a tsunami.

“When they get that deep, they’re less likely to trigger tsunamis,” said Paul Whitmore, director at the National Tsunami Center in Palmer. “They still can in the local area, but they don’t pose a threat for distance areas.”

Full Story
Edited by Skookum, Sep 16 2015, 08:11 PM.
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The Whether Man
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Since 1900, There Have Been Six Earthquakes Greater Than Magnitude 8 in Alaska
Alaska is no stranger to strong quakes. Between the Aleutian Islands and another inland earthquake hot spot in southwestern Alaska, the state has born the brunt of six of the 89 magnitude 8.0+ earthquakes that have hit around the world since 1900. Open this up to magnitude 7.9 events as well and you'd add another five. Full Story

Analyzing Alaska's Totally Harmless Megathrust Earthquake
Monday was a good day for earthquakes. Alaska's 7.9 was the largest, next in line was a 6.9 magnitude earthquake and its related aftershocks off the coast of Raoul Island, New Zealand. Both were large enough to cause substantial damage, but far enough away from populated areas so as not to cause deaths and damage. Full Story

PLANETARY TREMORS: Global Seismic Uptick
USGS scientist says Alaska, New Zealand quakes might be linked. Full Story
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Skookum
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Gas production blamed for rise in Colorado, New Mexico quakes
Mon Sep 15, 2014

(Reuters) - The deep injection of wastewater underground by energy companies during methane gas extraction has caused a dramatic rise in the number of earthquakes in Colorado and New Mexico since 2001, U.S. government scientists said in a study released on Monday.

The study by U.S. Geological Survey researchers is the latest to link energy production methods to an increase in quakes in regions where those techniques are used.

Energy companies began producing coal-bed methane in Colorado in 1994, then in New Mexico five years later. The process creates large amounts of wastewater, which is pumped into sub-surface disposal wells.

Scientists have long linked some small earthquakes to work carried out below ground for oil and gas extraction, which they say can alter pressure points and cause shifts in the earth.

The new study, published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA), focused on the Raton Basin, which stretches from southern Colorado into northern New Mexico.

The report said the area had been "seismically quiet" until shortly after major fluid injection began in 1999. But since 2001, the scientists said, the area experienced 16 earthquakes of greater than 3.8 magnitude, compared with only one of that strength recorded during the previous three decades.

"The increase in earthquakes is limited to the area of industrial activity and within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of wastewater injection wells," the study said.

The researchers said "several lines of evidence" suggest the earthquakes are directly related to wastewater disposal as a by-product of extracting methane, and not to the separate practice of hydraulic fracturing occurring in the area.

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a controversial technique that involves pumping water and chemicals into rock formations underground to push out gas and other hydrocarbons.

The USGS scientists said there are now 21 high-volume wastewater disposal wells in Colorado and seven in New Mexico, and that since mid-2000 the total injection rate across the basin has ranged from 1.5 to 3.6 million barrels per month.

They said the timing and location of seismic events correspond to the documented pattern of injected wastewater, and that their findings suggest seismic events are initiated shortly after an increase in injection rates.

Experts say fracking and wastewater disposal may also be linked to the soaring number of earthquakes rocking Oklahoma, which has already surpassed last year's record-breaking 222 "felt" earthquakes, defined as those strong enough to rattle items on a shelf.
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This undated handout image provided by the US Geological Survey (USGS) shows where the earthquake hazard increased and decreased from 2008. Red/brown increased. Blue decreased. A new federal earthquake risk map dials up the shaking hazard just a bit for about half of the United States and lowers it for nearly a quarter of the nation. The U.S. Geologic Survey updated Thursday its national seismic hazard maps for the first time since 2008, taking into account research from the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the Japanese coast and the surprise 2011 Virginia temblor.
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The Earthquake That Will Destroy The Pacific Northwest

Scientists were able to date the last major earthquake thanks to Japanese records from the early 18th century, which noted an 'orphan tsunami':

"Finally, in a 1996 article in Nature, a seismologist named Kenji Satake and three colleagues, drawing on the work of Atwater and Yamaguchi, matched that orphan [tsunami] to its parent—and thereby filled in the blanks in the Cascadia story with uncanny specificity. At approximately nine o’ clock at night on January 26, 1700, a magnitude-9.0 earthquake struck the Pacific Northwest, causing sudden land subsidence, drowning coastal forests, and, out in the ocean, lifting up a wave half the length of a continent."

When the quake hits, the land won't just shake — it will shift:

"When the next very big earthquake hits, the northwest edge of the continent, from California to Canada and the continental shelf to the Cascades, will drop by as much as six feet and rebound thirty to a hundred feet to the west—losing, within minutes, all the elevation and compression it has gained over centuries."

The damage, if the earthquake reaches its full potential strength, will be catastrophic:

"Whoever chooses or has no choice but to stay there will spend three to six months without electricity, one to three years without drinking water and sewage systems, and three or more years without hospitals. Those estimates do not apply to the tsunami-inundation zone, which will remain all but uninhabitable for years."

Equal parts scientific mystery story and (scientifically accurate!) disaster movie script, start reading this terrifying piece on the massive earthquake that will someday hit the Pacific Northwest, you won't be able to tear yourself away.

FULL STORY
Edited by Skookum, Sep 16 2015, 08:02 PM.
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Thanks for posting this. Great article! Lotsa history and all the new stuff too. To be honest I thought the Pacific Northwest was going to have the big one several years ago and passed up an opportunity to visit. When it didn't happen I joined everyone else in the waiting game. :nailbiter:

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Skookum
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Well, isn't that special? Between the Cascadia Subduction Zone & the Yellowstone Caldera looming maybe it's time to begin the southerly reverse flow.

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Earthquake Chili Sept. 16 2015

8.3 (preliminary) earthquake hit Chili today prompting a tsunami watch for Hawaii but not the continental U S.


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/tsunami-warning-issued-for-hawaii-after-chile-earthquake/
Edited by Skookum, Sep 16 2015, 08:03 PM.
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Shake, Rattle and Roll

Oklahoma has become the quake capital of the world. Who knew? :dunno:

Experts say it's only a matter of time before the "big one" shakes Oklahoma

Article Here
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