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Shecoda's Pictures
Topic Started: Jul 16 2016, 02:52 PM (290 Views)
Shecoda
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Took a recent trip to Yuma.

These are some of the pics I took along the way.

This is Round Mountain. Round Mountain is at the top of the world in Jacumba, CA. It sits right next to Highway 8. Round Mountain is exactly what you think it is. There is a back road to the Mountain and it is accessible from that direction for hiking. The same road taken in the other direction leads to the nudist colony. Sorry no pics on that subject. :giggle:

coming and going

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The Dunes, The Third Star Wars desert scenes were filmed here.
The water in the front is the deadliest body of water in the US, the All American Canal

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On the other side of the road, not too far in the distance is the border fence, the fence between the US and Mexico. It is amazing how close to Highway 8 the border really is. The fence was erected to keep people from crossing illegally into the US and and drowning in the Canal which wanders all over the desert. The water is used to flood land and grow crops. I will try to get a pic of the border fence next visit.

Some of the rocky terrain, there are miles of it on the downhill slide from the mountains to the desert. The road out of the mountains to the desert floor is a
10 mile 6% downhill grade.

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Skookum
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Awesomely rugged landscape; almost gives me wanderlust again.

Being a lifelong flatlander, the first time driving over that mountain pass from the east.....the altitude gave me heart palpitations & dizzy, almost blackout spells. :cuckoo: :laugh: Needless to say, that was all "mental"; I think the elevation tops out at maybe almost 3000 ft. ? :hardehar:

Frieda & me at the edge of that very desert, eons ago.
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cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Shecoda
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6,000 ft.

I can do 10,000 ft, but at 14,000 ft all I wanted to do was go to sleep. Not good, that is brain edema.
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Pareidolia (par-i-DOH-lee-a): The new term for swamp gas
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Shecoda
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Skookum
Jul 16 2016, 05:08 PM
Awesomely rugged landscape; almost gives me wanderlust again.

Being a lifelong flatlander, the first time driving over that mountain pass from the east.....the altitude gave me heart palpitations & dizzy, almost blackout spells. :cuckoo: :laugh: Needless to say, that was all "mental"; I think the elevation tops out at maybe almost 3000 ft. ? :hardehar:

Frieda & me at the edge of that very desert, eons ago.
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I have both ocean scenes and backcountry scenes near and see both many times a year. I like being by the water but would rather have the country landscape view. At night, I prefer seeing ridges and mountains by moonlight.

Not a city lights person at all. Always want rural areas to live in.
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Pareidolia (par-i-DOH-lee-a): The new term for swamp gas
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Skookum
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Oracle
Jul 17 2016, 01:09 AM
I have both ocean scenes and backcountry scenes near and see both many times a year. I like being by the water but would rather have the country landscape view. At night, I prefer seeing ridges and mountains by moonlight.

Not a city lights person at all. Always want rural areas to live in.
Cities are certainly more convenient; but, I am drawn to the quiet of wide open spaces away from the concentration of concrete & bright lights. :smile:

6,000-ft mountain pass -
Okay, then.....I probably started phazing out at 2,000. :embarrass: :hardehar:
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Kamalam
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Love your photos, Oracle... I really enjoy seeing people's adventures and photos of places near and dear to their hearts. Wide open spaces are amazing.

Skookum, finally I get to see what you look like - when was that pic taken, sometime in the 70s?! Aren't you a cutie!

When we went to Santa Fe I wondered if the altitude was getting to us (7000 feet). Some mornings I would wake up with small nose bleeds but that might also have been from the dry heat. I loved the geography of the southwest and the groundedness of the earth and stone. Stan said working out was harder than at our normal sea level existence. I wouldn't know since the most working out I did was checking out the hotel's pool, realizing I couldn't stand the piped music blaring from the speakers outside, and walking back to our room. :th-down: Totally ruined my vibe.
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Shecoda
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I live at 1,500 ft.

I don't know if that is the reason I can do higher elevations. Our mountains are at 6000 feet at the peak, but most of the good hiking trails are about 5,500 or under.

I frequently visit Julian, a little gold mining town turned tourist destination in the mountains at 4,000 feet. Never had a problem at either Julian or hiking in the higher mountains past Julian. We used to camp in the higher mountains, guessing about 5,500 feet. The campground is the beginning of what I call our flat hike, very little elevation gain or loss around a very large mountain meadow that can also be a lake if there are enough winter rains. We start our hiking season in late September, early October when the heat abates on this trail.

Across the road from the campground it is a short hike to the Pacific Crest Trail, which extends from Canada to Mexico. This trail is on the side of the mountains with the desert below, at least in our area. I would like to hike or ride it someday from Mexico to Canada, but would want to go with a small group of people, not alone. I am not in shape for hiking it at this point in time. I would really have to workout hard to be able to do that hike.

A lot of people hop the hike, shorter daily hikes, a night in a motel, then another daily hike, night in.....well you get it. They do this all the way up the trail. Easier on the bod, less stuff to carry. Usually they need a support vehicle to get them into the nearest town from the trail.

This is how a lot of people hike the Appalachian Trail as well.

I notice in Wikepedia the PCT is designated a horse riding trail, but trust me, the part we hiked wasn't really conducive to riding. I would be worried about falling off the edge of the world.
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Navi
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This is a wonderful thread. I love looking at the pictures and reading about everyone's experiences. :smile:
My choice? All the way down the rabbit hole.Posted Image
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Shecoda
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I enjoy this thread as well.
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Shecoda
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I haven't been around as much as I used to be. I have taken up hiking. I hike 3-4 hours three to four days a week. This is somewhere between 8-11 miles, depending on the terrain.

Here are a few of the pictures:

This is Mt. Woodson - Lat/Lon: 33.00866N / 116.97059W Elevation: 2881 ft / 878 m, But from the East side it is a hike up a paved service road, the road elevation is around 1681 above Sea level so the climb from this side is a gain/ loss of 1200 Ft. It is a steady incline and a 4.3 mile round trip. There are no flat spots on this hike. It is all uphill and all downhill. This mountain supports the 911 system for San Diego County, and a lot of the regular communication for the San Diego City, as well as the San Diego County police and fire departments. All the major cellphone carriers have towers on the summit as well. You can see all the towers. It is like walking through a forest of towers at the top.

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This is Potato Chip Rock, at the Summit. It is very trendy to climb out onto the chip and take a selfie, or have someone else take a picture of them on the rock.

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People rock climb and do bouldering on the large rocks along the trail

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Skookum
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"Potato Chip"...... :eek: eeeeeeek!! That looks like it could break off any minute; I'd definitely be too 'chicken' to climb out there. :bubblegummer:

and....good for you!! :ballcap-r: getting out for those walks.
I think that's the very best thing one can spend time doing for body & mind "tune up". :smile:
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Navi
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Nice pics! More! More!
My choice? All the way down the rabbit hole.Posted Image
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Shecoda
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I know this is late, but apparently one of our nearby towns has a mayor that has a good sense of humor.

This was his April Fools joke: Potato Chip Rock breaks. The joke went viral (see above images for pic of Potato Chip Rock)

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Shecoda
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I was back up Mt. Woodson yesterday. I seem to struggle on hills, especially if they are the first part of the hike. It is amazing the number of hikes around here that have instant uphills from the beginning of the hike. It takes 5-15 minutes to become aerobic. That means that it can take up to 15 minutes for someone to have enough oxygen in their system to drive muscles for fast, constant, sustained movement. For instance, aerobic exercise can be floor aerobics in the gym or at home, using a treadmill, an elliptical machine, riding a bicycle, hiking or walking distance or swimming laps Until this state of oxygenation is reached everyone, no matter how fit, feels like they are struggling to breathe. It usually takes me 5-7 minutes to reach this state. However, I find when I immediately start on hills, it seems to take me longer than normal to reach this state. In hopes to increase my fitness level and get over this inability to hike hills from the start of the hike, I try to hike Woodson at least once a week. I am also hampered by where I feel safe enough to hike. There are four places close that I feel comfortable to hike in alone. I carry a giant can of bear spray, but when I hike alone, I like to hike on highly popular trails. That way I am not alone long, somebody always comes along very quickly and the chance of attack by animal or human isn't very likely due to the proximity of other people.

This happened in 2010 on a very highly popular hiking trail within the boundaries of the San Diego City limits. Many years ago, maybe 20 or 25 years ago we had a woman hiking on a trail in the mountains who was attacked and killed by a mountain lion. ARTICLE

In my area, it is a human attack I am warier of than a mountain lion attack, although the Cuyamaca Mountains are linked very closely with the mountain foothills surrounding my little town. Note the date of the article was in 1994 so it has been a while. We don't have bears this far south in Southern California, they have been hunted to extinction in this area. They do exist in the mountains of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Bear Map

I see coyotes frequently when I hike, and cows free range in one of the local preserves. I range farther on weekends when I have a partner to hike with, and many of the preserves farther out from where I normally hike have free range cattle in them. One of the local preserves has a nesting pair of golden eagles and a nesting pair of bald eagles. There are always the usual hawks and turkey buzzards flying about as are the ubiquitous ravens and other small birds I don't identify as I am not a birder. The meadowlarks are nesting now and have very pretty songs to sing in warning as I hike by their nests. Things are already turning brown, it doesn't take long in Southern California for vegetation to turn from green to brown when the rains stop. Many of the wildflowers have already peaked, others are still blooming.
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Kamalam
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Shecoda, I've just discovered your thread and lovely photos! Your description sounds so very like John Muir! I have an app I listen to sometimes called Calm and there's an option to have an "adult bedtime story" as a way to help folks fall asleep. I've been listening to the John Muir descriptions of birds and nature and you remind me so much of that.

So glad you are getting out there and experiencing life so directly and intimately. I would love to do the same but my fitness level is about "newborn kitten" level. We're clearing out a section of the garage so that we can put the recumbent bicycle and some exercise mats down.

Stay safe (so glad you're taking precautions) and I can't wait to get updates on your experiences!
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