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Bundy Ranch activist group
Topic Started: Apr 13 2014, 12:20 AM (396 Views)
Skookum
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*sis~boom~bah*
April 12, 2014

BUNKERVILLE, Nevada (Reuters) -
U.S. officials ended a stand-off with hundreds of armed protesters in the Nevada desert on Saturday, calling off the government's roundup of cattle it said were illegally grazing on federal land and giving about 300 animals back to the rancher who owned them.

The dispute less than 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas between rancher Cliven Bundy and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management had simmered for days. Bundy had stopped paying fees for grazing his cattle on the government land and officials said he had ignored court orders.

Anti-government groups, right-wing politicians and gun-rights activists camped around Bundy's ranch to support him in a standoff that tapped into long-simmering anger in Nevada and other Western states, where vast tracts of land are owned and governed by federal agencies.

The bureau had called in a team of armed rangers to Nevada to seize the 1,000 head of cattle on Saturday but backed down in the interests of safety.

"Based on information about conditions on the ground and in consultation with law enforcement, we have made a decision to conclude the cattle gather because of our serious concern about the safety of employees and members of the public," the bureau's director, Neil Kornze, said in a statement.

The protesters, who at the height of the standoff numbered about 1,000, met the news with applause. Then they quickly advanced on the metal pens where the cattle confiscated earlier in the week were being held.

After consultations with the rancher's family, the bureau decided to release the cattle it had rounded up, and the crowd began to disperse.

"This is what I prayed for," said Margaret Houston, one of Bundy's sisters. "We are so proud of the American people for being here with us and standing with us."

A number of Bundy's supporters, who included militia members from California, Idaho and other states, dressed in camouflage and carried rifles and sidearms. During the stand-off, some chanted "open that gate" and "free the people."

A man who identified himself as Scott, 43, said he had traveled from Idaho along with two fellow militia members to support Bundy.

"If we don't show up everywhere, there is no reason to show up anywhere," said the man, dressed in camouflage pants and a black flak jacket crouched behind a concrete highway barrier, holding an AR-15 rifle. "I'm ready to pull the trigger if fired upon," Scott said.

LONG-SIMMERING ANGER

The dispute between Bundy and federal land managers began in 1993 when he stopped paying monthly fees of about $1.35 per cow-calf pair to graze public lands that are also home to imperiled animals such as the Mojave Desert tortoise. The government also claims Bundy has ignored cancellation of his grazing leases and defied federal court orders to remove his cattle.

"We won the battle," said Ammon Bundy, one of the rancher's sons.

The bureau said Cliven Bundy still owes taxpayers more than $1 million, which includes both grazing fees and penalties, and that it would work to resolve the matter administratively and through the court system.

Jack Kay, a professor of communication at Eastern Michigan University and an expert on militias, said the federal government did well to step back from the conflict. "These things tend to escalate, someone looks like they're going to pull the trigger and then something happens," he said.

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, who earlier in the week suggested the federal government had created an atmosphere of "intimidation," said in a statement on Saturday he welcomed the bureau's action. "Given the circumstances, today's outcome is the best we could have hoped for," he said.

Hundreds of Bundy supporters, some heavily armed, had camped on the road leading to his ranch in a high desert spotted with sagebrush and mesquite trees. Some held signs reading "Americans united against government thugs," while others were calling the rally the "Battle of Bunkerville," a reference to a American Revolutionary War battle of Bunker Hill in Boston.

The large crowd at one point blocked all traffic on Interstate 15. Later, as lanes opened up, motorists honked to support the demonstrators and gave them thumbs-up signs.

In an interview prior to the bureau's announcement, Bundy said he was impressed by the level of support he had received.

"I'm excited that we are really fighting for our freedom. We've been losing it for a long time," Bundy said.

But an official with an environmental group that had notified the government it would sue unless federal land managers sought to protect tortoises on the grazing allotment used by Bundy's cattle expressed outrage at the end of the cattle roundup.

"The sovereign militias are ruling the day," said Rob Mrowka, senior scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity. "Now that this precedent has been set and they're emboldened by the government's capitulation, what's to stop them from applying the same tactics and threats elsewhere?"

Roger Taylor, retired district manager with the Bureau of Land Management in Arizona, also said the agency's decision to release the cattle will have repercussions.

"The (agency) is going to be in a worse situation where they will have a much more difficult time getting those cattle off the land and getting Bundy in compliance with regulations," he said.

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The Whether Man
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I wonder if Clive Bundy is any relation to Al? If so, hopefully they're no more than distant cousins...

With the kind of 'Bundy luck' Al has, Clive surely doesn't need a serious manifesting of it right now.
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Skookum
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The Whether Man
Apr 13 2014, 05:01 PM
I wonder if Clive Bundy is any relation to Al? If so, hopefully they're no more than distant cousins...

With the kind of 'Bundy luck' Al has, Clive surely doesn't need a serious manifesting of it right now.
TAFJ!

Ha! I was wondering about a link with Ted. :eek:
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MataHari
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Skookum
Apr 13 2014, 07:08 PM
The Whether Man
Apr 13 2014, 05:01 PM
I wonder if Clive Bundy is any relation to Al? If so, hopefully they're no more than distant cousins...

With the kind of 'Bundy luck' Al has, Clive surely doesn't need a serious manifesting of it right now.
TAFJ!

Ha! I was wondering about a link with Ted. :eek:
Let me get this straight:
The cattle were penned up, yet a shout was "let the people free"?!!? :wtf:
Keep your twinkie out of my Nutella. Paraphrasing Mallie from Darkness Radio

https://www.google.com/maps/@21.29392,-157.837688,3a,75y,4h,90t/data=!3m3!1e1!3m1!2e0!6m1!1e1


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The Whether Man
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Skookum
Apr 13 2014, 07:08 PM
The Whether Man
Apr 13 2014, 05:01 PM
I wonder if Clive Bundy is any relation to Al? If so, hopefully they're no more than distant cousins...

With the kind of 'Bundy luck' Al has, Clive surely doesn't need a serious manifesting of it right now.
TAFJ!

Ha! I was wondering about a link with Ted. :eek:
I'd say insomuch the 'theory of relativity' applies here? However closely Clive and his near kin may be traced to any socially challenged Bundy branch, little doubt Ted IS the tree's most loathsome progeny who, while an outwardly charming and articulate individual, had no control over his fantasies and acted on his deep dark desires multiple times -

OTOH poor old Al is merely a sorry schlub of a shoe salesman who has a family that unmercifully mocks him, majorly identifies with a psychotic FOX TV anti-hero, and finds depictions of spirited independence and rugged individualism in traditional American Westerns like 'Hondo' to be greatly gratifying and enormously entertaining escapist diversions.

Harmless enough I guess - Though I suppose it IS entirely possible living under the unyielding and unending sadness and stress, with no real relief from his day to day plight in sight, mired in monetary misery and stifled socially week in week out, year on year on year he COULD have a complete and total reality-shattering break at ANY time...!

Showdown At The Bundy Ranch
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'Cowboy Bundy' Sez:
Sure, I may be on the psycho side - but
no damn way I'm any sort of FEDER
-Al!

"Psycho Dad" Original Theme | Extended Lyrics
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Skookum
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You're GOOD, WM! :biggrin:
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grumpychick
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I know about the Bundy Ranch and have followed the news but every single time I scroll through the board I read it as the Bunny Ranch. Which is a brothel also known as the Moonlite Bunny Ranch... Gah.
:mallet:
Posted Image"If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun." - Katharine Hepburn
"I carried a watermelon." - Frances Houseman
"Everyone deserves the chance to FLY!" - Elphaba Thropp


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Skookum
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grumpychick
Apr 20 2014, 07:36 PM
I know about the Bundy Ranch and have followed the news but every single time I scroll through the board I read it as the Bunny Ranch. Which is a brothel also known as the Moonlite Bunny Ranch... Gah.
:mallet:
:a-tension:


:cheeky:


:laugh:
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MataHari
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I keep reading Bunny instead of Bundy, too; though I knew not of the connection with a bordello.
Keep your twinkie out of my Nutella. Paraphrasing Mallie from Darkness Radio

https://www.google.com/maps/@21.29392,-157.837688,3a,75y,4h,90t/data=!3m3!1e1!3m1!2e0!6m1!1e1


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The Whether Man
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Bunnies, Bordellos and Clive? Stars and Garters!
A conflicting combo, but that's just for starters
(Though Reid and Obama among other things,
By and large act and rule like they were Kings) -

Federal Marshals and Nevada ranches
BLM agents and Bundy Tree branches
Tea Party stalwarts and what-all time brings,
How much is left 'til the Fat Lady sings...

Property seizures! Encroaching advances!
Firearms, itches, and back and forth glances!
Determined officials, protester mood swings
Most players packing far more than just slings:

When the shoe drops
When the raid starts
When the going gets bad
For Clive and his kin losing their favorite things
Will make them all feel so sad!
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MataHari
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So, you are a poet.
Keep your twinkie out of my Nutella. Paraphrasing Mallie from Darkness Radio

https://www.google.com/maps/@21.29392,-157.837688,3a,75y,4h,90t/data=!3m3!1e1!3m1!2e0!6m1!1e1


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The Whether Man
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MataHari
Apr 23 2014, 08:59 PM
So, you are a poet.
I indeed do have my poet moments though satirical song parodies are more my forte (especially insofar often the stuff writes itself!)
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Skookum
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*sis~boom~bah*

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Burns, Oregon
Jan. 4, 2016

One of the apparent leaders of the armed occupation of an Oregon federal wildlife refuge on Monday toned down the violent rhetoric he delivered a day earlier, saying the activists are not trying to provoke a confrontation with the government.

"We don't want it to end with violence," said Ryan Bundy in an interview, who with his brother Ammon has spoken for the the group occupying a group of federal buildings in Oregon’s outback.

"We're not looking for bloodshed."

On Sunday, Ryan Bundy was quoted as saying activists would kill, if necessary. But on Monday he offered a more muted stance: Violence is still possible, but activists will not act further to provoke law enforcement.

As it stands, the group – at the very least -- is breaking park rules at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge by occupying federal buildings that were closed and unoccupied when the activists arrived on Saturday night.

On Monday morning, the entrance to the federal wildlife refuge was blocked by a turquoise SUV, but a man at the entrance said anyone had a constitutional right to enter the premises.

An icy gravel path slopes gently into the nature preserve, where more than a dozen buildings, from administration to a museum, sit silent and snowbound.

But an occupying activist -- who would be described only as a resident who left the rainy Willamette Valley of his childhood for snowy central Oregon -- said every building on site is full.

"There's 17 buildings and all of them full of people," said the man as he spread gravel over the well-worn tire tracks in the snow early Monday morning.

Inside the encampment, there is little presence of the occupiers, especially while the sun hid behind clouds and the temperature dipped below 15 degrees Fahrenheit.

But in previous encounters with the Bundys, activists have claimed that they had snipers hidden nearby training rifles on anyone who approached the activists, something the Southern Poverty Law Center says it has confirmed.

The way the activists described their armed occupation is akin to environmental groups who take up residence in trees to stop logging -- they believe their presence is one of the final barriers to total government control of the West, and without them, it would be lost.

"We're trying to accomplish the task of restoring rights to the people who have lost them or surrendered them," Ryan Bundy said.

The long-running debate over federal control of public land that has fueled political conflict for generations has come to a new standoff in the rolling ranch lands of southeastern Oregon. The new activists began trickling into town in December, hanging on at the fringes, brandishing rifles and handguns, proselytizing from the beds of pickups against federal land ownership until, without warning, they struck.

On Saturday night, after a coordinated and peaceful protest of more than 100 people, a group of at least 15 men, some of them armed, broke off and occupied a federal wildlife refuge, blocked its entryway and declared themselves its rightful owners.

They remained there Sunday night, bundled against freezing temperatures and holding their position in one of the most direct provocations yet of the federal government, and one that has so far gone unchallenged.

State and federal authorities were preparing to establish a law enforcement command post Monday to coordinate a response to the standoff at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge after activists at the refuge spent much of Sunday behind their makeshift barrier — a pickup and an American flag — eating donated chili, holding a news conference and surveying the refuge from an occupied observation tower.

“We will not fire unless fired upon, but we will stand and defend the Constitution,” Jon Ritzheimer, who traveled from Phoenix, said in a video posted from the refuge on Facebook.

When Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy led a weeks-long armed standoff over $1 million in federal grazing fees in 2014, federal and local agents were a constant presence. But Sunday’s occupation of an uninhabited building at the Oregon refuge, apparently led by his sons, showed no signs of law enforcement opposition.

Harney County Sheriff David M. Ward warned residents to avoid the refuge, about 30 minutes south of Burns, and warned that the group’s intent was nothing less than total overthrow of the government.

“These men came to Harney County claiming to be part of militia groups supporting local ranchers, when in reality these men had alternative motives, to attempt to overthrow the county and federal government in hopes to spark a movement across the United States,” Ward said in a statement Sunday.

Rhetoric from some of the protesters compared the standoff to encounters that led to the deaths of activists and federal agents.

Ritzheimer warned law enforcement officials against creating “another Ruby Ridge,” a reference to a deadly 1992 siege in northern Idaho between the FBI and backwoods cabin dweller Randy Weaver.

“Yes, there are some people that are armed,” Ritzheimer said. “We need to defend our rights. That's what the 2nd Amendment is there for, people.”

Despite the absence of any law enforcement, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) was briefed Sunday morning by the FBI special agent in charge of the Portland division and said the occupation was being monitored closely by state, federal and local authorities.

“The FBI is on this every minute,” Wyden said in an interview. “But based on comments from what we’ve heard in the community and what’s been reported, we may be in just the early stages of this.”

Wyden compared the frustrations of the activists to those of all rural Oregonians, who face a troubled economy yet to fully recover from the decline of the timber industry and dwindling federal dollars to replace lost timber income.

“There’s enormous frustration about the economy and a very powerful sense in rural communities that nobody listens to them, that they don’t have any power, that their voices don’t matter,” Wyden said. “But the next step isn’t to be led by some outsiders into doing something that doesn’t help anybody.”

The activists echoed that frustration.

“It's about this community being trampled on,” said one of the organizers of a rally that preceded the standoff, who did not identify himself, as he stood on the bed of a pickup in the parking lot of a Safeway supermarket.

“This is the public saying we're not going to take it anymore, we've had it.... The people of the republic are tired, and it starts right here in this parking lot, guys.”

Those leading what amounts to an armed occupation at the small, remote building say they are the vanguard of a national movement to resist the government’s ownership of vast stretches of land in the West.

The move began Saturday after the rally near Burns, where more than 150 people gathered in support of two locals who are facing additional jail time for arson — a sentence widely seen by their conservative supporters as a deeply unjust punishment and an example of federal bludgeoning.

Dwight Hammond, 73, and his son Steven Hammond, 46, said they set fires in 2001 and 2006 to reduce the growth of invasive plants and protect their property from wildfires.

The two were convicted of the arsons three years ago and served time — Dwight three months and Steven a year. But a judge ruled their terms were too short under federal law and ordered them back to prison for about four years each.

Hammond has said he and his son plan to report to prison Monday in San Pedro as ordered by a judge, but the court decision has generated controversy across the West.

After the protest Saturday, the small, armed breakaway faction proceeded to move on to the wildlife refuge, which was closed and empty.

“We can enforce the Constitution in Harney County and that’s what we intend to do,” Cliven Bundy's son Ammon told reporters at a rally. “We have a lot of plans.”

Numerous Western conservatives have called for the return of federal lands to state and local government. The movement has waxed and waned since the so-called Sagebrush Rebellion of the 1980s, which centered on ranchers’ rights and the money that could be made from timber harvesting, mining and ranching if only the federal government didn’t forbid such profitable endeavors.

The movement has picked up steam in recent years, led by Utah legislator Ken Ivory, who helms a national organization called the American Lands Council that tries to persuade county and state governments to pursue the ownership of federal land. A watchdog group has accused him of fraud in three states for his use of taxpayer dollars to pursue his agenda.

The Southern Poverty Law Center said in a report on the earlier Bundy standoff that the militiamen and the federal land-return movement are part of the same spectrum.

“Anti-government extremists have long pushed, most fiercely during Democratic administrations, rabid conspiracy theories about a nefarious New World Order, a socialist, gun-grabbing federal government and the evils of federal law enforcement,” the center said.

The Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, incorporated in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt, has grown since its inception and presents challenges to the ranching families in the area, who say they are increasingly hemmed in by the federal preserve.

Beginning about one month ago, Ammon Bundy and others arrived in Burns and agitated locals, who wondered what they were up to. By Saturday, the plan became clear, and the Bundys, via their ranch’s Facebook page, called for “all freedom-loving people” to help occupy the wildlife refuge.

“The people are finally getting some good use out of a federal facility,” read a post by the Bundy Ranch on its Facebook page.

The protest quickly overwhelmed the small Harney County Sheriff’s Office, which asked the public to stop calling on Saturday because residents were having trouble reaching emergency dispatchers.

“A collective effort from multiple agencies is currently working on a solution,” Ward said in a statement. “For the time being, please stay away from that area.”

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Skookum
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Leader of Oregon occupation arrested, 1 dead after confrontation with authorities
Jan 26 (Reuters)

- The leader of an armed occupation at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon was arrested on Tuesday during a confrontation in which one person was killed and another was wounded, the FBI said.

Protesters were still occupying the remote Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon after leader Ammon Bundy's arrest and the Federal Bureau of Investigation was setting up a perimeter, a law enforcement official told Reuters.

The takeover at Malheur that started Jan. 2 is the latest flare-up in the so-called Sagebrush Rebellion, a decades-old conflict over the U.S. government's control of millions acres of land in the West.

Four other people were taken into custody along with Bundy following the confrontation along Highway 395 in northeast Oregon, according to the FBI. A fifth individual was arrested by the Oregon State Police in a separate incident in Burns, Oregon.

All of those arrested face federal charges of conspiracy to use force, intimidation or threats to impede federal officers from discharging their duties, the FBI said.

The Oregonian newspaper reported that Bundy had been en route to a community meeting in John Day, Oregon, with several other members of the occupation, where he was scheduled to be a guest speaker, when authorities stopped his vehicle.

Some 25 miles (40 km) of Highway 395 was shut down in both directions following the incident, a spokesman for the state department of transportation said.

Local media reported that a hospital in nearby Burns had been placed on lockdown. Reuters could not immediately confirm that report.

The occupiers of the wildlife refuge said they were supporting two local ranchers who were returned to prison this month for setting fires that spread to federal land. The ranchers' lawyer has said the occupiers do not speak for the family.

Burns Mayor Craig LaFollette told Reuters that while he had limited information about the night's events, he hoped the stand-off would come to a peaceful end.

"I think my perception is that people's patience was running thin and that the community as a whole was looking for some resolution and to have these people leave," he said.

Law enforcement officials had largely kept their distance from the buildings at the refuge, 30 miles (48 km) south of the small town of Burns in rural southeast Oregon's Harney County, in the hope of avoiding a violent confrontation.

Local residents have expressed a mixture of sympathy for the Hammond family, suspicion of the federal government's motives and frustration with the occupation.

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Shecoda
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Not much to say other than it had to end eventually.
Definition:
Pareidolia (par-i-DOH-lee-a): The new term for swamp gas
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