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Food Recalls
Topic Started: Dec 15 2011, 06:14 PM (357 Views)
Skookum
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Ocean Spray recalls more dried cranberries
Dec 7, 2011
Ocean Spray has expanded last month's recall of Craisins dried cranberry products, said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration today. An additional five lots of the packaged food were found to have also been contaminated with tiny metal fibers.

According to the FDA, the five lots of Original Flavor Craisins Dried Cranberries were distributed in Arizona, California, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington. They can be identified by the following information:
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As with the previously announced Craisin recall, there have been no reports of illness from consumers eating the recalled dried cranberries. And while injuries from such fine fibers "are unlikely," this expanded recall is being made "out of an abundance of caution to ensure the safety of our consumers," said Ocean Spray.

Consumers with packages of the dried cranberries further identified by this recall are urged to discard the product, but save the UPC and Best By Date labels which can be used to obtain a free replacement coupon. Customers can call the toll-free Ocean Spray Consumer Hotline (800-662-3263) for additional details.
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cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
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grumpychick
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Thanks for the info!
Posted Image"If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun." - Katharine Hepburn
"I carried a watermelon." - Frances Houseman
"Everyone deserves the chance to FLY!" - Elphaba Thropp


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Skookum
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FDA halts OJ from Canada after fungicide test
Jan 30, 2012

Shipments of orange juice from Canada have been stopped at the border after testing by the Food and Drug Administration found low levels of the fungicide carbendazim, which is banned in the U.S. and was previously found in orange juice product shipments from Brazil.

Fungicides are chemical compounds or biological organisms used to kill or inhibit fungi or fungal spores that can damage agriculture.

After fungicide was discovered in the orange juice products from Brazil, the FDA blocked all imports, so that it could test for carbendazim, which studies have linked to a higher risk of liver tumors in animals. The FDA stated previously that for its current testing, if levels of carbendazim are greater than 10 parts per billion, the orange juice product would be destroyed or returned to its country of origin.

On Friday, the FDA said that six shipments from Canada had tested positive for the fungicide. And to date five shipments from Brazil have tested positive.

Thus far, the FDA has collected samples from 80 shipments of orange juice or orange juice concentrate. Of these, 29 shipments tested negative for carbendazim.

To date, the samples that have tested positive for carbendazim had levels between 10 and 52 parts per billion. The Environmental Protection Agency has said that levels under 80 parts per billion are not a safety risk. FDA testing of samples from domestic manufacturers is ongoing.

The majority of orange juice for sale in the U.S. is from oranges grown domestically, and about 25 percent is imported, according to figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

It was the Coca Cola Company, owner of the Minute Maid brand, that originally alerted the FDA that their orange juice and that of their competitors carried residues of the chemical. Coca Cola was legally required to come forward, under the 2008 Amendments to the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act creating a Reportable Food Registry.

If you're concerned about the orange juice that may be currently sitting in your fridge you can look at the label to find its country of origin, and don’t use it if you don’t want to. You can also purchase organic juice.

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cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Navi
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Infinite One
And just when I was thinking about getting some OJ for the first time in months.

Thanks! I had missed this somehow.
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Skookum
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Navi
Feb 10 2012, 03:51 PM
And just when I was thinking about getting some OJ for the first time in months.

Thanks! I had missed this somehow.
Isn't that funny?! We have been on a long, dry spell re:OJ too. Steady diet of cranberry juice; but for the first time in a long time bought some OJ a couple weeks ago. It's just about gone ...... Fred Meyer brand; juice concentrate from USA/Mexico/Brazil/Costa Rica. ...pfffffft!! :mallet:

Fresh gallon we got this week is Costco brand; not from concentrate; product of USA & Mexico. :dunno: ..... MAYBE that's O.K., but maybe I'll dig a little deeper next time.
Yeah.....I just read this article this morning. :dry:
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Skookum
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(Not so much an alert as an exposé.)
_____

Applesauce Exposè.

The KING 5 Investigators have learned that federal inspectors complained for years about significant food safety violations at a Yakima plant but their superiors didn’t put a stop to it.

"I thought it was terrible because I have never seen anything like that in my life," said Jerry Pierce, a recently retired U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector who was assigned to the Snokist Growers plant in 2008. He said he watched Snokist employees “reprocess” and sell applesauce that belonged in the garbage bin.

“It's appalling that the company would take those measures just to make a few dollars," said Wendy Alguard, the USDA inspector who worked at Snokist from 2009 until the summer of last year.

Snokist Growers is a century-old cannery that processes and packages 50,000 tons of cherries, apples, pears and plums each year. The inspectors say that leaks in the packaging would cause 300 gallon bags of applesauce to spoil. Snokist would scrape thick mold off the top of the spoiled applesauce, heat-treat the remaining product and then send it down the production line for sale to the public.

“I thought it was wrong, my goodness,” said Pierce.

Blowing the whistle

The KING 5 Investigators obtained public records showing Snokist reprocessed more than 23,000 gallons of moldy applesauce in the year 2010 alone. Other records show Snokist's own consultant concluded in 2009 that the mold in applesauce "would not be eliminated by your firm's thermal process." Records show the company continued selling it to customers.

The inspectors say they repeatedly told their boss about the moldy applesauce.

"I guess they promised my boss they wouldn't do it again and within a week they were doing it again,” said Pierce.

"I had contact with my boss many times and he basically told me to mind my own business," said Alguard.

Food chain

The USDA had inspectors in Snokist’s plant because the company is a major supplier to the national school lunch program. The USDA grades and certifies food deemed acceptable for school lunches. Alguard and Pierce say they did their best to make sure that reprocessed applesauce didn’t get into school lunch food. However, they could not stop it from going to non-government buyers like grocery store chains. Consumers were often buying Snokist product without even knowing it. The company processes and packages fruit for many major brands, which distribute the product to stores under their own labels.

Snokist declined to provide KING 5 with a list of distributors, brands and grocery stores which it supplied with reprocessed applesauce. The USDA and Food and Drug Administration says it does not have records of companies that Snokist supplies.

FDA steps in

It was another government agency that finally put a stop to Snokist’s recycling of fruit products. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) came to the Yakima plant after 18 North Carolina school children got sick from eating Snokist applesauce. The FDA determined that packaging defects caused the applesauce to spoil, not reprocessing of moldy applesauce.

“I approached (the FDA inspectors) and told them I wanted to talk to them,” said Alguard. Her tip led the FDA to put an immediate stop to the re-processing of applesauce. The FDA investigation is continuing and Snokist lost its school lunch contract with the FDA.

USDA Response

In a written statement to KING 5 News, the US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service said it had limited authority to stop shipments of non-government food.

"Snokist is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and is currently under investigation. Thanks to the diligent efforts of Agricultural Marketing Service employees with authority limited to solely grading Snokist products, only products made with wholesome ingredients were allowed to enter the stream of commerce with USDA approval. In 2011 USDA signed an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that strengthens its oversight and reporting powers that will provide additional authority to stop bad actors in the future. This agreement is part of an ongoing effort by USDA to make unprecedented improvements to food safety."

Video at LINK
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Navi
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:nailbiter: Aw gee thats just plain terrible!
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Skookum
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Navi
Feb 15 2012, 06:39 AM
:nailbiter: Aw gee thats just plain terrible!
Watching them skimming the thick layer of mold off the top on the news was gross!

"Reprocessing" :wacko: GAG!
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Skookum
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Frozen Vegetable Recall = Listeria


CRF Frozen Foods of Pasco, Washington is voluntarily recalling fifteen frozen vegetable items that have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
No illnesses have been reported to date, but the company is recalling the products as a precaution. The Listeria was discovered through routine testing by state health officials in Ohio. Listeria monocytogenes was found to be present in one lot of Individually Quick Frozen (IQF) organic petite green peas and one lot of IQF organic white sweet cut corn.

More details - LINK
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
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Skookum
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What labels do you look for on meat packages?

June 22, 2016

Grass Fed
What consumers think: About two-thirds of the people in our survey correctly believe that this claim should mean that the animal was exclusively fed grass or hay—no grain—for its entire life. Fifty-eight percent believe that grass fed animals are not given antibiotics or hormones. Six out of 10 consumers think that meat producers should be allowed to make a partial grass-fed claim if the animal’s diet was less than 100 percent grass.

What it really means: The Food Safety and Inspection Service division of the Department of Agriculture has a decent definition of grass-fed: the meat must come from animals that have never been given grain and have access to pasture during the grazing season, although the farms are not required to be inspected by the agency. And under FSIS rules, the animal can still be raised with antibiotics or hormones.

Partial grass-fed claims, such as 85 percent grass-fed, on beef are permitted, but they are meaningless. All cattle spend the first part of their lives eating grass or hay; some are fed grain to make them grow faster and larger before slaughter. So there’s little difference between a partially grass fed animal and a conventionally fed one. In addition, these animals may not have continuous access to pasture and spend a portion of their lives confined to a feedlot.

The American Grassfed Association and Animal Welfare Approved Grassfed labels have stricter standards than the USDA “grass fed” definition. Those seals indicate that the cattle are fed only grass or forage from weaning to slaughter, graze on pasture, are not confined to feedlots, and are not given any drugs routinely, including antibiotics and hormones. (AGA standards also require that animals be born and raised in the United States.) An independent third party inspects the farms to verify that the AGA’s standards are being met.

Humanely Raised
What consumers think: Over 80 percent of our survey participants said they believed that meat with this label comes from farms that are inspected to verify the claim, and many thought it means the animals have adequate living space (77, percent), have access to the outdoors (68 percent), and were slaughtered humanely (71 percent).

What it really means:
This term has no official definition and it is not verified either by USDA or any independent organization. To be certain the meat you buy comes from animals that are humanely raised, look for the Animal Welfare Approved seal, a GAP 1-5+ label, or the Certified Humane seal. The USDA Organic seal has some animal welfare standards, such as adequate space, but not to the same degree as other animal welfare labels.

No Growth Hormones/No Added Hormones/No Hormones or Steroids Added

What consumers think: The majority of consumers believe that animals should not be given hormones or any growth promoting drugs.

What it really means:
This label is truthful, but can be misleading. Cattle can be raised with hormones, so a no hormone claim on beef is meaningful. But the USDA does not allow hormones or steroids to be used in poultry or pork. Producers making this claim must follow it directly with a line saying this, but that information is almost always in smaller print and may be hard to spot. But with any type of animal, a “no hormone” claim doesn’t mean the animal was not given antibiotics, or that hogs were not given ractopamine, a drug that promotes growth that is neither a hormone nor an antibiotic.

No Nitrates/No Nitrates or Nitrites Added
What consumers think: Nearly two thirds of consumers in our survey believe this means no nitrates at all, whether from artificial or natural sources.

What it really means: The meat may not have been cured with synthetic nitrates or nitrites, but probably was cured using concentrated nitrates from vegetables like celery or onion. The curing chemistry is the same no matter where the nitrate comes from. The World Health Organization classifies nitrates and nitrites as “probably carcinogenic to humans,” While the USDA has limits as to how much synthetic nitrates/nitrites a food can contain, there are no restrictions for natural ones. Check ingredients lists for celery juice or celery powder, which act as nitrates and carry the same risks as artificial nitrates.

Organic

What consumers think: More consumers said they bought natural (73 percent) versus organic food (58 percent). Over two-thirds think organic food is more expensive than natural food. In a previous Consumer Reports survey, about two-thirds of people thought that the natural label on meat and poultry meant no artificial ingredients or colors were added, and no artificial growth hormones were used. More than half mistakenly thought that it means no artificial ingredients in the animal's feed, no GMOs in the feed and no antibiotics or drugs were given to the animal. Upwards of 60 percent of consumers believed organic foods had these attributes.

What it really means:
Organic is a term consumers can rely on. Natural is not. On meat labels, the USDA organic seal indicates that the animal was given only organic feed. The animals can’t be given antibiotics or growth hormones. Even sick animals treated with antibiotics can’t be labeled organic. The exception is chickens: They can be given antibiotics in the egg or on the day they hatch but not afterward.

Natural on meat and poultry labels does mean no artificial ingredients added to the cut of meat and that the meat is minimally processed, but natural meat and poultry can be raised with antibiotics and natural beef can be raised with synthetic hormones.

Raised Without Antibiotics/No Antibiotics Administered

What consumers think: Half of the people in our recent survey said this claim means the animal did not receive any antibiotics. A quarter of them said that it means no antibiotics or any other drugs were used.

What it really means:
Antibiotic use in healthy farm animals, either to promote growth or prevent disease, is rampant and it is contributing to the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria. It is harder to treat someone with an infection caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, because the bacteria have become immune to the drugs normally used to combat them.

A “no antibiotic” or “raised without antibiotic” claim should be reliable but verification isn’t required. The meat producer can submit an affidavit to the USDA, but the agency does not inspect the farms. However, the label does not mean that hormones are other drugs were not used.

However, if you see the claim “no growth promoting antibiotics,” it is arguably an attempt to put one over on consumers. The FDA has asked drug companies to change the labels on antibiotics used in animals to indicate that they are not for growth promotion. But they can still be used to “ensure animal health,” or to prevent or control disease. That means the practice of giving animals low doses of antibiotics throughout their lives can continue, just under another name, doing little if anything to help control the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

While it may be true that no growth promoting antibiotics were used, antibiotics could have been used for disease prevention. While Consumer Reports believes sick animals should be treated with antibiotics, the low doses that are given to animals regularly to prevent disease destroy only some bacteria. Those few hardy survivors are excreted in manure, where they multiply, eventually leading to colonies of more and more indestructible superbugs.

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cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Navi
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Well that's scary as freakin' hell. :unsure: So what's all this palaver about eating only grass fed beef?
Now I am not feeling as guilty about not being able to afford it. :laugh:
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Skookum
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Navi
Jul 6 2017, 08:04 AM
Well that's scary as freakin' hell. :unsure: So what's all this palaver about eating only grass fed beef?
Now I am not feeling as guilty about not being able to afford it. :laugh:
No lie!! :cuckoo:


:laugh: :laugh: .........Ain't it the truth ‽ ‽
cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Shecoda
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Here is a funny observation.

Here in California eggs can only be sold if they come from free range chickens.

I bet you have this idea that the chickens are now roaming around free, drifting about the field, blissfully culling the ground for insects and worms.

Well........guess what. I live in an area where there are chicken farms. The long silver topped barns, where the chickens are kept, are empty. They are now across the street in a field. There are four or five chicken huts available to the chickens to keep the weather off the chickens and provide shade. They are about 5 feet X 12 feet and can house only 60 or so chickens. Bigger huts can handle more chickens.

The huts near me have some sort of permanent tarp off each long side of the hut, extending about 5 or 6 feet providing shade and some shelter. The chickens are free to come and go as they please.

They never leave the huts and the shelters on the huts, rather they stand around in a large flock, never leaving the shade of the huts even in nice weather. There are no trees for them to flock in so I guess they all cram themselves into the hut at night. I don't know if the tarps are somehow dropped to create sides on the hut. Llamas are used to keep the coyotes and random dogs away. I don't know what keeps the bobcats and mountain lions away, so I would guess the chickens are some how confined at nights.

Anyhow, the point is the chickens are just as crammed in together and as connfined (by their choice) as they ever were in the barns.
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Skookum
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Chickens are generally stupid :laugh: ; but, even so ..... I have been in huge "chicken-houses" where the chickens had half their beaks cut off & they were stuffed into individual tiny cages where they couldn't stand up.

Nobody, I don't care how stupid, deserves to be treated like that.

They at least need to peck around in the weeds. :laugh:
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cows don't care what time it is because the're ...... well ......... cows.
and cows are idiots 🐮

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Sean_
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Skookum
Jul 19 2017, 03:08 PM
Chickens are generally stupid :laugh: ; but, even so ..... I have been in huge "chicken-houses" where the chickens had half their beaks cut off & they were stuffed into individual tiny cages where they couldn't stand up.

Nobody, I don't care how stupid, deserves to be treated like that.

They at least need to peck around in the weeds. :laugh:
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I agree.
Don't think about all those things you fear. Just be glad to be here.

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