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Dyatlov Pass incident
Topic Started: Aug 12 2011, 03:30 AM (5,581 Views)
yass
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The Dyatlov Pass incident refers to an event that resulted in the deaths of nine ski hikers in the northern Ural mountains. The incident happened on the night of February 2, 1959 on the east shoulder of the mountain Kholat Syakhl (Холат Сяхл) (a Mansi name, meaning Mountain of the Dead). The mountain pass where the incident occurred has been named Dyatlov Pass (Перевал Дятлова) after the group's leader, Igor Dyatlov (Игорь Дятлов).

The lack of eye witnesses to the circumstances of the tragedy, and subsequent journalistic investigations into the hikers' deaths, have inspired much speculation. Investigators determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow. Though the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] According to sources, four of the victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation—though this was likely added at a later date, since no mention is made of it in contemporary documentation, and only appears in later documents.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths. Access to the area was barred for three years after the incident.[1] The chronology of the incident remains unclear due to the lack of survivors.[2][3]

Background

A group was formed for a ski trek across the northern Urals in Sverdlovsk (Свердловск), now Yekaterinburg (Екатеринбург). The group, led by Igor Dyatlov, consisted of eight men and two women. Most were students or graduates of Ural Polytechnical Institute (Уральский Политехнический Институт, УПИ), now Ural State Technical University:

  • Igor Dyatlov (Игорь Дятлов), the group's leader
  • Zinaida Kolmogorova (Зинаида Колмогорова)
  • Lyudmila Dubinina (Людмила Дубинина)
  • Alexander Kolevatov (Александр Колеватов)
  • Rustem Slobodin (Рустем Слободин)
  • Yuri Krivonischenko (Юрий Кривонищенко)
  • Yuri Doroshenko (Юрий Дорошенко)
  • Nicolai Thibeaux-Brignolle (Николай Тибо-Бриньоль)
  • Alexander Zolotarev (Александр Золотарев)
  • Yuri Yudin (Юрий Юдин)

The goal of the expedition was to reach Otorten (Отортен), a mountain 10 kilometers north of the site of the incident. This route, at that season, was estimated as "Category III", the most difficult. All members were experienced in long ski tours and mountain expeditions.

The group arrived by train at Ivdel (Ивдель), a city at the center of the northern province of Sverdlovsk Oblast on January 25. They then took a truck to Vizhai (Вижай) - the last inhabited settlement so far north. They started their march towards Otorten from Vizhai on January 27. The next day, one of the members (Yuri Yudin) was forced to go back because of health problems.[1] The group now consisted of nine people.

Diaries and cameras found around their last camp made it possible to track the group's route up to the day preceding the incident. On January 31, the group arrived at the edge of a highland area and began to prepare for climbing. In a woody valley they built a storage for surplus food and equipment which would be used for the trip back. The following day (February 1), the hikers started to move through the pass. It seems they planned to get over the pass and make camp for the next night on the opposite side, but because of worsening weather conditions, snowstorms and decreasing visibility, they lost their direction and deviated west, upward towards the top of Kholat Syakhl. When they realized their mistake, the group decided to stop and set up camp there on the slope of the mountain.

The search

It had been agreed beforehand that Dyatlov would send a telegraph to their sports club as soon as the group returned to Vizhai. It was expected that this would happen no later than February 12, but when this date had passed and no messages had been received, there was no reaction—delays of a few days were common in such expeditions. Only after the relatives of the travelers demanded a rescue operation did the head of the institute send the first rescue groups, consisting of volunteer students and teachers, on February 20.[1] Later, the army and police forces became involved, with planes and helicopters being ordered to join the rescue operation.

On February 26, the searchers found the abandoned camp on Kholat Syakhl. The tent was badly damaged. A chain of footprints could be followed, leading down towards the edge of nearby woods (on the opposite side of the pass, 1.5km north-east), but after 500 meters they were covered with snow. At the forest edge, under a large old pine, the searchers found the remains of a fire, along with the first two dead bodies, those of Krivonischenko and Doroshenko, shoeless and dressed only in their underwear. Between the pine and the camp the searchers found three more corpses—Dyatlov, Kolmogorova and Slobodin—who seemed to have died in poses suggesting that they were attempting to return to the camp.[1] They were found separately at distances of 300, 480 and 630 meters from the pine tree.

Searching for the remaining four travelers took more than two months. They were finally found on May 4, under four meters of snow, in a ravine in a stream valley further into the wood from the pine tree.

Investigation

A legal inquest had been started immediately after finding the first five bodies. A medical examination found no injuries which might have led to their deaths, and it was concluded that they had all died of hypothermia. One person had a small crack in his skull, but it was not thought to be a fatal wound.

An examination of the four bodies which were found in May changed the picture. Three of them had fatal injuries: the body of Thibeaux-Brignolle had major skull damage, and both Dubunina and Zolotarev had major chest fractures. The force required to cause such damage would have been extremely high, with one expert comparing it to the force of a car crash. Notably, the bodies had no external wounds, as if they were crippled by a high level of pressure. One woman was found to be missing her tongue.[1] There had initially been some speculation that the indigenous Mansi people might have attacked and murdered the group for encroaching upon their lands, but investigation indicated that the nature of their deaths did not support this thesis; the hikers' footprints alone were visible, and they showed no sign of hand-to-hand struggle.[1]

There was evidence that the team was forced to leave the camp during the night, as they were sleeping. Though the temperature was very low (around -25° to -30°C) with a storm blowing, the dead were dressed only partially, and certainly inadequately for the conditions. Some of them had only one shoe, while others had no shoes or wore only socks.[1] Some were found wrapped in snips of ripped clothes which seemed to be cut from those who were already dead.

Journalists reporting on the available parts of the inquest files claim that it states:

  • Six of the group members died of hypothermia and three of fatal injuries.
  • There were no indications of other people nearby apart from the nine travelers on Kholat Syakhl, nor anyone in the surrounding areas.
  • The tent had been ripped open from within.
  • The victims had died 6 to 8 hours after their last meal.
  • Traces from the camp showed that all group members (including those who were found injured) left the camp of their own accord, on foot.
  • To dispel the theory of an attack by the indigenous Mansi people, one doctor indicated that the fatal injuries of the three bodies could not have been caused by another human being, "because the force of the blows had been too strong and no soft tissue had been damaged".[1]
  • Forensic radiation tests had shown high doses of radioactive contamination on the clothes of a few victims.[1]

The final verdict was that the group members all died because of an "unknown compelling force". The inquest ceased officially in May 1959 due to the "absence of a guilty party". The files were sent to a secret archive, and the photocopies of the case became available only in the 1990s, with some parts missing.[1]

Controversy surrounding investigation

Some researchers point out the following facts which were missed, perhaps ignored, by officials[2][3]:

  • After the funerals, relatives of the deceased claimed that the skin of the victims had a strange orange tan and were completely grey haired.[1]
  • A former investigating officer said, in a private interview, that his dosimeter had shown a high radiation level on Kholat Syakhl, and that this was the reason for the radiation found on the bodies. However, the source of the contamination was not found.
  • Another group of hikers (about 50 kilometers south of the incident) reported that they saw strange orange spheres in the night sky to the north (likely in the direction of Kholat Syakhl) on the night of the incident. Similar "spheres" were observed in Ivdel and adjacent areas continually during the period of February to March 1959, by various independent witnesses (including the meteorology service and the military).[1]
  • Some reports suggested that much scrap metal was located in the area, leading to speculation that the military had utilized the area secretly and might be engaged in a cover-up.[1]

Aftermath

In 1967, Sverdlovsk writer and journalist Yuri Yarovoi (Юрий Яровой) published the fiction novel "Of the highest rank of complexity" ("Высшей категории трудности")[4] which was inspired by this incident. Yarovoi had been involved in the search for Dyatlov's group and the inquest, including acting as an official photographer for the search campaign and in the initial stage of the investigation, and so had insight into the events. However, the book was written in the Soviet era when the details of the accident were kept secret, and Yarovoi avoided revealing anything beyond the official position and well-known facts. The book romanticized the accident and had a much more optimistic end than the real events – only the group leader was found deceased. Yarovoi's colleagues say that he had two alternative versions of the novel, but both were declined by censorship. Since Yarovoi's death in 1980, all his archives including photos, diaries and manuscripts have been lost.

Some details of the tragedy became publicly available in 1990 due to publications and discussions in Sverdlovsk's regional press. One of the first authors was Sverdlovsk journalist Anatoly Guschin (Анатолий Гущин). Guschin reported that police officials gave him special permission to study the original files of the inquest and use these materials in his publications. He noticed, however, that a number of pages were excluded from the files, as was a mysterious "envelope" mentioned in the case materials list. At the same time, unofficial photocopies of the case parts started to circulate among other enthusiastic researchers.

Guschin summarized his studies in the book entitled "The price of state secrets is nine lives" ("Цена гостайны - девять жизней")[3]. Some researchers criticized it due to its concentration on the speculative theory of a "Soviet secret weapon", but the publication aroused the public interest in the theory, stimulated by interest in paranormal. Indeed, many of those who remained silent for 30 years reported new facts about that accident. One of them was the former police officer Lev Ivanov (Лев Иванов), who led the official inquest in 1959. In 1990 he published an article[5] along with his admission that the investigation team had no rational explanation of the accident. He also reported that he received direct orders from high-ranking regional officials to dismiss the inquest and keep its materials secret after reporting that the team had seen "flying spheres". Ivanov personally believes in a paranormal explanation - specifically, UFOs.

In 2000, a regional TV company produced the documentary film "Dyatlov Pass" ("Перевал Дятлова"). With the help of the film crew, a Yekaterinburg writer, Anna Matveyeva (Анна Матвеева), published the fiction/documentary novella of the same name[2]. A large part of the book includes broad quotations from the official case, diaries of victims, interviews with searchers and other documentaries previously used for the film. The book details the everyday life and thoughts of a woman (an alter ego of the author herself) who attempts to resolve the case.

The Dyatlov Foundation has been founded in Yekaterinburg, with the help of Ural State Technical University, led by Yuri Kuntsevitch (Юрий Кунцевич), a close friend of Igor Dyatlov and a member of the search team. The foundation's aim is to convince current Russian officials to reopen the investigation of the case, and solve it. Its other purpose is the upkeep of "the Dyatlov museum", to honour the memory of the dead hikers.

Yuri Yudin, the sole survivor of the expedition, has stated, "If I had a chance to ask God just one question, it would be, 'What really happened to my friends that night?'"[1]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_Pass
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Here are some pictures. Later I may try getting babel translator to the page these came from, as it is written in Russian.

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Igor Dyatlov, leader of the doomed expedition

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Yuri Yudin – the only survivor – is hugged by Ludmila Dubinina as he prepares to leave the group; Dyatlov looks on

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The skiers' tent as it was discovered on 26 Feb 1959
(can you see ghostly entities and something round like an orb?)

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The pine tree under which the first two bodies were found

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Dyatlov Pass, with Kholat-Syakhl in the background

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http://www.skitalets.ru/works/2004/legend_sobolev/index.htm
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These would be the ghostly images I was referring to.
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I've found amazing, detailed info about this in an article at Fortean Times. I read the entire article at length to the finish, then found it had disappeared and no amount of refreshing (or deleting the cookie then trying to refresh) would bring the page back. Only an offer to register was showing. Fortunately, I had just saved the page before that happened and so can draw from it. Of course I will link it to the addie of the article, but just warning that you might want to read it through the first time. Well, unless you'd simply like to register.

More about that in a bit.
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According to Wiki, he said "If I had a chance to ask God just one question, it would be, 'What really happened to my friends that night?'" On another page it says Yuri Yudin thinks an explosion killed his friends. "The level of secrecy surrounding the incident suggests to him that the group might have inadvertently entered a secret military testing ground, a theory supported by the radiation on their clothes".

edit* Ivanov said “I can’t say what those balls were – some kind of arms or aliens or something else – but I am certain that they are directly connected to the deaths of those lads.”
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talk about 999
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Nine sets of footsteps led towards a nearby forest for 500 meters then stopped as they were covered with snow. Searchers followed the direction of the footsteps for 1,5 km (~1 mile) until they reached the edge of the pine forest. Here, under a pine tree, they found remains of a fire and two bodies which belonged to Krivonischenko and Doroshenko, both wearing only their underwear. The branches of the pine tree were broken up until 4.5 meters (15 feet) from the ground, indicating that someone had climbed the tree in order to look for a tent (or to look if a danger which made them flee was gone).
http://weirdcase.com/dyatlov-pass-incident/


I'm trying to get these 'Sverdlov's' sorted out, to figure out which, if any, mentioned might be stewie's great uncle.

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THE EXPEDITION
Yudin and his nine companions had set out on their journey on 23 January 1959, their destination Otorten Mountain in the northern Urals. He and eight of the others were students from the Ural Polytechnic Institute in Ekaterinburg, located in the Sverdlovsk region, 1,200 miles (1,900km) east of Moscow.

Back then, the city was still called Sverdlovsk, and was best remembered as the place where the Tsar and his family were brutally murdered after the Russian Revolution (it was named after the Bolshevik party leader Yakov Sverdlov, who had himself played a role in the killings). In 1959, the Soviet Union was in the middle of a thaw of sorts after decades of Stalinist repression, and life under the new premier, Nikita Khruschev, was becoming somewhat freer. The 1950s saw, for one thing, an explosion of ‘sport tourism’ in Russia as the country started to move away from the austerity of the immed­iate post-war years. A mixture of skiing, hiking and adventure, sport tourism was more than simply a sporting activity in the Soviet Union – for the inhabitants of this closed and regimented society it was a way of escaping the repressive strictures of everyday life, of returning to nature, and of spending time with a circle of close friends, away from the prying eyes of the state. Such activities were hugely popular with students, who would set out on long trips to some of the wildest and remotest parts of the Soviet Union.

The group from the Ural Polytechnic Institute was made up of experienced members of the college’s sport tourism club, led by 23-year-old Igor Dyatlov, respected for his expertise in cross-country skiing and mountaineering. Their route to Otorten, which would see them reaching heights of 1,100m (3,600ft) above sea level, was classed as ‘Category III’ – the most dangerous for the time of year – but the combined experience of the students meant that there was nothing unusual in their undertaking such an expedition.

Aside from Dyatlov and Yudin, the group was made up of Georgy Krivonischenko (24), Yury Doroshenko (24), Zina Kolmogorova (22), Rustem Slobodin (23), Nicolas Thibeaux-Brignollel (24), Ludmila Dubinina (21), Alexander Kolevatov (25) and Alexander Zolotaryov (37). All were students of the Institute, except the much older Zolotaryov, who some sources suggest was a slightly strange figure whom Dyatlov was init­ially reluctant to take on the expedition. But Zolotaryov had proved himself a highly experi­enced sport tourist and came with a recommendation from some of Dyatlov’s friends.

So, on 23 January the party of 10 set off on what was meant to be a three-week cross-country trip. They travelled by train to Ivdel, arriving on 25 January, and then onwards by truck to Vizhai – the last inhabited settlement before the snow-covered wilderness between them and Otorten. They began their trek on 27 January. On the 28th, however, Yudin became ill and had to turn back, leaving the party of nine to go on without him. It was the last time he saw his companions alive. The course of events following Yudin’s departure can only be reconstructed from the diaries and photographs left by the rest of the group and retrieved from the area where they made their final camp.

Having left Yudin behind, the group skied on across uninhabited areas and frozen lakes, following the paths of the local indigenous tribe, the Mansi, for another four days. On 31 January, they reached the river Auspia, where they set up a base at the edge of the highland area, leaving equipment and food there for the return journey. From here, they began climbing the pass toward Otorten on 1 February. For whatever reason – most likely bad weather conditions causing them to become lost – they found themselves on the slopes of the mountain Kholat Syakhl at a height of just below 1,100m (3,600ft). Here, at around 5pm, they pitched their tent for the night, although by going just 1.5km (almost a mile) down the mountain they could have found shelter from the harsh elements in a forest.

Their last diary entries show that the students were in good spirits; they even produced their own newspaper – the Evening Otorten – a typically Soviet way of group bonding. The next day, they planned to continue on to the mountain, just 10km (six miles) to the north, before returning to their base camp.

http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/1562/the_dyatlov_pass_incident.html
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I wonder if Yuri Yudin really intended to go with the group, or if he was but 'delivering' them to their fate. I also wonder what those frozen preserved organs (especially the brain) went for on the market. Now, what did WIO call those kind of brains? The kind produced when someone is terrified? [adrenylchrome?]

nine who went (sent forward) + one who saw them off (and went back, sick)
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Beginning by the part superior and of left to right, the protagonists of the event: Igor Diatlov, Ludmila Dubinina, Alexander Kolevatov, Alexander Zolotaryov, Georgi Krivonischenko, Nicholas Thibeaux-Brignollel, Rustem Slobodin, Yuri Doroschenko, Zina Kolmogorova and Yuri Yudin
Suceso inexplicable en los Urales (Inexplicable event in the Urals)
babel translated page, Spanish to English

Yuri Yudin... Interestingly, Yuri's neck appears to be translucent.
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Yuri Yudin's friends have some strange hands.
note the 3 fingers showing to the left and what looks like an extra long thumb on the other.
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http://www.aquiziam.com/pictures/dyatlov_p...k_to_vizhay.jpg

Excerpt from an interesting read for comparison.
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The name, Otorten, in translation from Mansi language means "Mountain of the dead men", and the native people try to avoid visiting the place. It's located in upper parts of Pechora River at a joint of borders of Sverdlovsk, Perm, and Tyumen Provinces and Komi Republic.

http://www.bigfootencounters.com/articles/trachtengerts.htm


The following excerpt is from the babel fish translation from the original page which was written in Russian. I got to the Russian page from a link in the story above. Instead of "Mountain of the dead" it translates as "Mountain of corpses".
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[Otortoe] grief, by sufficiently gently sloping and suitable for the easy lift on skis. They according to the plan of the march they planned to rise to it. [Otorten], in the transfer from the [mansiyskogo] “mountain of corpses”, where local they try not to walk, it is located in the region of the upper reaches of Pechora in the joint of the borders of Sverdlovsk, Permian, By Tyumen' reg. and the Komi.

babel translated Russian to English
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Yeah, I got the idea that the organs got swept away with no returns and no further comments.

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Both accounts agree that their clothes had high levels of radiation. Authorities opened a criminal investigation. Autopsies failed to find evidence of foul play. Investigators said the group died as a result of a forceful unknown power, then abruptly closed the case and sent files and boxes with the skiers’ organs to a top secret archive.

Read more: http://mysterious-places.suite101.com/article.cfm/dyatlov_pass_bizarre_incident#ixzz0WQDtIgTv


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Yudin also said the released documents contained no information about the condition of the skiers’ internal organs. “I know for sure that there were special boxes with their organs sent for examination, “ he said.

http://www.sptimes.ru/story/25093
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I ran across a thread that started with a video about the flu vaccine (ingredients, including radium), one of the replies got me thinking about this story and the radiation that was detected. Radioactive aether forms?
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In the Ukraine, they did test a long time back. This was in a forested area.
The area was so radioactively dirty, that it had combined with aether forms, and they had radioactive beings, that could kill people by influence in that forest.
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Excerpt from "Blue blood true blood" by Stewart Swerdlow.

Quote:
 

In the 1950s, the Soviet Union signed an agreement with the Tau Cetians to use bases in Siberia and under the Ural Mountains. For this reason, the city of Sverdlovsk, named after my great-uncle, the first president of the Soviet Union, was closed to outsiders (click image left).
Many experiments involving radiation on the public were performed here from 1958 through the 1980s. A United States spy plane was shot down over Sverdlovsk in the early 1960s when the United States was trying to learn about the secret activities taking place there.

http://hi.baidu.com/cool_moon/blog/item/c09aa111589de674cb80c465.html



It was suggested to me that an entrance to Agartha might be in the Ural mountains, which is how I landed this page, by combining the words "Agartha" and "Ural mountains" in a search. There are online references to a "Temple of Agartha" in the Ural mountains, but this is Stewart's account of the entry points to Agartha:

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The Reptilian survivors went to Northern India, the Earths interior, the planet Venus, and parts of Central and South America. Inner Earth became the "homeland" for most of the surviving Reptilians of Lemuria. Here, they created a vast underground civilization.
This started the legends of hell and demons living in fire under the Earth. They built tubes containing fast, subway-like vehicles that can travel to any point on the Earth within a few hours. They created the famed underworld cities of Akkadia, Agartha, Hyperborea, and Shamballa that are sought by explorers to this very day. These cities are built along the inside wall of the inner crust that lines the interior of the Earth.
Remember, the hollow Earth is not a theory, but a scientific fact caused by the cooling and spinning of a planet as it is ejected from a star or sun.
Shall we check to see if Meredith Lady Young, author of "AGARTHA" (book about the civilization of the inner earth) agrees?
The primary entry points to the inner Earth are via the North Pole, where there is an opening of 1300 miles, and the South Pole, with an opening of 950 miles. These can be seen from space. That is why commercial aircraft are not allowed to fly over these areas; not because of magnetic disturbances, which is the "official" reason. Admiral Byrd reported on these openings in the 1920s until his information was concealed by the government.
At the very centre, or nucleus, of inner Earth, there is a globe of energy left over from the creation of this planet that acts as an inner sun. It is the light from this object suspended by gravity and centrifugal force that causes the light of the aurora borealis.
Numerous cave entrances to the inner Earth exist in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Mountains in the western United States, as well as less numerous openings in the Ozarks and Appalachian Mountains. Entries also exist in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, and the Caribbean. There are also numerous sub-oceanic entry points, particularly in the deep trenches of the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic submarine mountain ranges especially on or near the Azores, Canary Islands, and the Falklands.
All of these areas are closely guarded by local governments and N.W.O. elite forces. Artificially created entrances exist under the new Denver airport, the Giza Plateau in Egypt, major Air Force complexes around the world, and many of the Temples in India and China. A major Chinese entry point is under the Shensi Pyramid that is out of bounds for everyone in Western China.
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These details are interesting to note.
Quote:
 
Trakhtengertz has also stated that in their ‘newspaper’, the Evening Otorten, the students had written in large letters: “From now on we know that the snowmen exist”. Perhaps, though, we shouldn’t read too much into this; it goes onto say: “They can be met in the Northern Urals, next to Otorten mount­ain.” Given the humorous tone of the ‘newspaper’, it’s quite likely that the students were jokingly referring to themselves rather than recording a genuine sighting of an almasty.

http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/1562/the_dyatlov_pass_incident.html


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But Yudin said Dyatlov told him when they parted ways that the group would probably return a few days later than planned.

As such, no one was worried when the group failed to reappear on Feb. 12.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/date/2008/02/04/article/article/302661.html
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Quote:
 
This is the last picture that was made by the camera of the Dyatlov group.


Filtered:

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Image from a very comprehensive page on the Dyatlov pass incident:

http://www.ermaktravel.com/Europe/Russia/Cholat-%20Syachil/Kholat%20Syakhl.htm
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For whatever it's worth. I had to inspect closely to try and determine if it was just a collar with a wrinkle in it. It seems that one minute I'd look and it was just a collar and another it was a translucent neck. I'm on the side of translucent neck though because that's what I'm seeing.

Also note a hand in the background that has the insect like joints similar to that observed on a man (guard?) behind Michelle Obama in a photo and seen on Britney Spears in a photo.

Yuri Yudin larger image

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note hand above (in lower left of picture)


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If you colored in the dark area around his eyes it would look like a gray's eyes.
The little portion showing appears to have a vertical slit pupil.
Could just be the outlining of his iris.
His eyes are certainly unusual.


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Not the best filtering job. I like using 'plastic wrap' to get dimension
but my settings are usually different. In this case I found the settings
set a certain way and just 'went with it'. I would normally set the filter
to show less bubbles, but this is okay.
Quite the jawline eh?


Guard's hand (note joints)
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Britney's hand (note joints)
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Hand near Yuri (note joints)
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Dyatlov Pass Incident - The Movie

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The Dyatlov Pass Movie

In this as yet unnamed horror/thriller movie, a group of American students return to investigate the incident decades later and face the same force that killed the nine Russian hikers in 1959.

This page will be updated as information is released.

Director: Renny Harlin
Producers: Alexander Rodnyansky, Kia Jam, Renny Harlin, Sergei Bespalov
Studio: A.R Films / Midnight Sun Pictures / KJam Media / Aldamisa International
Writer: Vikram Weet
Release Date: 2013

http://www.squidoo.com/dyatlov-pass-movie
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