Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Jee. We hope you enjoy your visit.




Username:   Password:
Add Reply
How did native americans harvest and cure tobacco?
Topic Started: Nov 28 2010, 04:23 AM (2,316 Views)
yass
Member Avatar
Administrator
[ *  *  * ]
How did native americans harvest and cure tobacco?

To harvest tobacco, the Muskogee would first "top" the tobacco plants by removing the top where the flowers would bloom out leaving the plants with extra energy to make the bottom leaves longer (long bottom). After about one moon cycle (28 days) we would harvest the rest of the plant by cutting the stalks with a bone knife and take the harvested stalks (with leaves still attached) to an unlit smoke house. The tobacco would be hung in the smoke house by spikes or hooks made of bone or wood.

The smoke house is likened to what many people use to smoke or cure meat, fish, vegetables or fruit.

We would let the tobacco wilt slightly in the smoke house for another moon cycle (28 days) before we would cure and dry the leaves. The leaves stay green though, our Native plant varieties are different from the "eastern" varieties.

To cure the leaves, we would use an indirect "wet" wood smoke (cypress works the best) and to add flavor and color we would add wild cherry or wild plum wood to the smoke - curing could take from 6 hours to 2 days depending on the desired flavor and moisture content of the tobacco.

To dry the leaves, we would use and indirect "dry" wood smoke from oak or hedge and we would start the drying process for 6 hours to 2 days - after 2 days we would let let the smoke (fire) die and allow the tobacco to dry naturally.

It should be noted that different tribes had different ways of curing and drying tobacco. Tobacco was also seen differently by different tribes; some tribes saw tobacco as a sacred thing only to be used by the shamans/medicine men or chief. Some tribes used tobacco as a type of currency. Some tribes used tobacco only religiously or ceremoniously. Some tribes used tobacco constantly.

For nearly every tribe/nation tobacco was seen as a gift from our Creator.


================================================

We usually take the leaves off the plant and hang them just as you have it. Our types of tobacco don't turn brown like West Indian tobacco, rather they tend to stay green. That doesn't change the taste when you smoke it though, it's just a feature of the type it is. I don't know who cures theirs, but Eastern Cherokee people don't.

Eastern Band Cherokee

===============================================

We have a native tobacco out here in Calif. Not the same as the eastern varieties. We wait for it to just begin to bloom, not full bloom, then we uproot it and hang it upside down in the shade until it dries out. We break it up and smoke it.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090518172608AA6WDiX
-Love will lead
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
yass
Member Avatar
Administrator
[ *  *  * ]
Posted Image

History of Tobacco

For the Europeans, tobacco products started on October 12th, 1492. Christopher Columbus had disembarked on one of the Bahama islands. The natives had brought gifts to the white God. One of these gifts was the tobacco plant.

While he was there he had the chance to witness men and women smoking. In his logbook he wrote about the smoking habits of the natives. Upon his return to Spain, he reported what he had seen of the natives walking around carrying fire and inhaling smoke from one end.

Jean Nicot, French ambassador in Portugal, was behind the reputation of tobacco spreading to the east. Jean Nicot, gave the name Herba Nicotiana , to the plant. He gave it's main substance the name Nicotine. In 1560 He sent some tobacco to the mother of French King, Catherine de Medici along with a report about it's medical powers.

Recommending to her that she inhale pulverized tobacco leaves.

The pipe came to England in 1586 by Sir Francis Drake. Smoking tobacco then became mostly habit for English high society. Despite Turkish authorities opposing smoking, tobacco conquered Turkey by the end of the sixteenth century. Then tobacco conquered Near East and the whole of Balkan.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, smoking habits changed alot. Cigarettes were smoked by people in Spain and Portugal. People in England, Netherlands and Germany smoked pipes. During Napoleon's wars cigarettes were introduced to England. Cigarette smoking then soon spread to Turkey. Francisco Goya drew smokers with cigarettes in the eighteenth century. After the war between Turkey and Russia other Europeans began smoking cigarettes.

Tobacco smoking was common to Native Americans prior to the arrival of the Europeans. It's use during ancient ceremonies has been documented. Tobacco was widely believed among the Native Americans to posses magical powers.

To this day the use of tobacco is very wide spread. Today's use of tobacco is varied from premade cigarettes , roll your own cigarettes, pipes to hookah. For as many people that will quit smoking there are just as many new smokers starting up. But no matter how you smoke , the effects are still the same.

http://federaltobaccotaxes.updatestatus.tk/
Attached to this post:
Attachments: curing_tobacco.jpg (120.42 KB)
-Love will lead
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
yass
Member Avatar
Administrator
[ *  *  * ]
This is posted in the Health & Safety section and I thought I'd add it here for reference. I found an interesting video which I'll post next:

Radioactive fertilizer

It's a well established but little known fact that commercially grown tobacco is contaminated with radiation. The major source of this radiation is phosphate fertilizer.1 The big tobacco companies all use chemical phosphate fertilizer, which is high in radioactive metals, year after year on the same soil. These metals build up in the soil, attach themselves to the resinous tobacco leaf and ride tobacco trichomes in tobacco smoke, gathering in small "hot spots" in the small-air passageways of the lungs.2 Tobacco is especially effective at absorbing radioactive elements from phosphate fertilizers, and also from naturally occurring radiation in the soil, air, and water.3

To grow what the tobacco industry calls "more flavorful" tobacco, US farmers use high-phosphate fertilizers. The phosphate is taken from a rock mineral, apatite, that is ground into powder, dissolved in acid and further processed. Apatite rock also contains radium, and the radioactive elements lead 210 and polonium 210. The radioactivity of common chemical fertilizer can be verified with a Geiger-Mueller counter and an open sack of everyday 13-13-13 type of fertilizer (or any other chemical fertilizer high in phosphate content).4

Conservative estimates put the level of radiation absorbed by a pack-and-a-half a day smoker at the equivalent of 300 chest X-rays every year.5 The Office of Radiation, Chemical & Biological Safety at Michigan State University reports that the radiation level for the same smoker was as high as 800 chest X-rays per year.6 Another report argues that a typical nicotine user might be getting the equivalent of almost 22,000 chest X-rays per year.7

http://www.acsa2000.net/HealthAlert/radioactive_tobacco.html


also

http://www.webspawner.com/users/radioactivetobacco/index.html
-Love will lead
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
yass
Member Avatar
Administrator
[ *  *  * ]
Harvesting and Drying Tobacco Leaves




Ideally, if anything, tobacco should be grown in the garden and processed without the radioactive fertilizer, and without formaldehyde which is used to induce arthritis in test animals, and which is in so many products and causes so many health problems it is just mind numbing.
-Love will lead
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
« Previous Topic · Garden and Healing Herbs · Next Topic »
Add Reply