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Key AFP Promotions and Movements; updates, discussions
Topic Started: May 20 2005, 11:36 AM (17,259 Views)
dororodo
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let's just hope and pray that not one among these officers will emulate Gen. Garcia :nono:


mb.com

President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo swore into office the newly promoted officers of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) at the Rizal Hall of Malacañang last Wednesday afternoon.

Among the new officers inducted by the President were Rear Admiral Constantino Jardiniano, Rear Admiral Tirso Danga, Maj. Gen. Agustin Dema-ala, Maj. Gen. Alexander Yano, Maj. Gen. Vicente Guerzon Jr., Brig. Gen. Roberto Ver, Brig. Gen. Malou Quevedo, Brig. Gen. Jose Barbieto, Brig. Gen. Bernard de Luna, Brig. Gen. Charlie Fayloga, Commodore Amable Tolentino, Brig. Gen. Salvador Peñaflor, and Brig. Gen. Michelangelo Siscar.

Also inducted were Commodore Dick Ruiz, Commodore Petronilo Magno, Brig. Gen. Alfredo Ubungen, Commodore Leonardo Calderon, Brig. Gen. Amando Melo, Brig. Gen. Willie Palugod, Brig. Gen. Nehemias Pajarito, and Brig. Gen. Raymundo Ferrer.


mga ser, follow the straight and narrow and do not betray the Filipino people, no more Garcias please.
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commando
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Is Brig.Gen. Roberto Ver in any way related to Gen. Fabian Ver?

I congratulate Maj.Gen. Agustin Dema-ala on his promotion. He was commander of Task Force Comet during the latest offensive in Mindanao a few months ago. He is now accordingly rewarded with new and greater responsibilities. :thumb:
****THIS WE'LL DEFEND****
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adroth
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Thanks to a source that has requested anonymity, I now have the following names for the indicated positions

Commo Sanchez COMNSSC
Capt Agdamag COMNAVFORNOL
Capt Rodriguez PATROL FORCE

Does anyone here have their first names? Google searches haven't revealed any recent news articles for these folks.

COs for COMNAVFORCEN and the Ready Force have been identified and have been removed from the list above
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maldita
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i might be wrong...capt rodriguez's first name is david...i'll check it out from a commander friend of mine... :bow:
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adroth
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maldita
Aug 7 2006, 03:43 AM
i might be wrong...capt rodriguez's first name is david...i'll check it out from a commander friend of mine... :bow:

Thanks Maldita :thumb:

This is where this information will go: StarTracker
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Rapidfire
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Fajardo promoted to general

Col. Gregorio Fajardo, 303rd Infantry Brigade commander, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier general in the Armed Forces of the Philippines.

Fajardo who also served as commander of the 11th Infantry Battalion in 2004, was among the 10 senior military officials promoted effective Dec. 23 last year, that includes his predecessor, Brig. Gen. Jogy Leo Fojas, who is now a major general. Fojas who spent several years as commander of the 57th Infantry Battalion in Mabinay, Negros Oriental, and later as commanding officer of the 303rd Infantry Brigade, is now the AFP deputy chief of staff for operations.

The promotion and retirement of several senior military officers may also trigger a revamp in the AFP, starting next month.

Maj. Gen. Victor Ibrado, commanderl of the 3rd Infantry Division, is reportedly among those affected by the revamp as he is being groomed to be the commanding general of the Special Operations Command.

SOCOM controls the Army's Special Forces and Scout Ranger Regiments, elite units of the Philippine Army, which used to be commanded by now AFP chief of staff Hermogenes Esperon.

Meanwhile, the NAPOLCOM provincial officer Joseph Celiz has also been promoted to assistant regional director of Napolcom in the Autonomous Region for Muslim in Mindanao, effective Jan. 1.

However, it has not been determined yet who will succeed Celiz as the Napolcom provincial officer of Negros Occidental.*GPB

source
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seWer Rat
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amateur sewer cleaner

New 302ND IB head assumes
By KIT BAGAIPO

Army Col. Jesse Dellosa was formally installed as new commanding officer of the 302nd Infantry Brigade during turnover ceremonies at the command's base in Camp Rajah Sikatuna, Katipunan, Carmen town replacing Brig. Gen. Arthur Tabaquero last Monday.

The turnover was witnessed by Maj. Gen. Victor Ibrado, commanding general of the 3rd Infantry Division who said the 302nd Brigade is in good hands as Dellosa is one of the most awarded officers of the Armed Forces.

Tabaquero, who is now chief of the Resource and Management Office of the Philippine Army headquarters in Fort Bonifacio, thanked local officials and the different sectors of the community that contributed to the recognition of the 302nd IB as best brigade of the 3rd Infantry Division.

Dellosa is a member of the Philippine Military Academy Class '79 and was former battalion commander of the 1st Scout Ranger regiment in Sulu.

The new commander declared his commitment to community participation and promised to continue Gen. Tabaquero's good relations with the Boholanos during his acceptance speech.

Dellosa, who has Bicolano roots, have seen action in the army's campaigns against the Abu Sayaff in Mindanao.

Tabaquero served as 302nd IB commander for a year.

http://www.theboholchronicle.com/fpage.php...12&s7=&s9=&s10=
To avoid criticism, write nothing, say nothing, do nothing, BE NOTHING.
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adroth
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seWer Rat
Feb 1 2007, 02:21 PM
New 302ND IB head assumes
By KIT BAGAIPO

Army Col. Jesse Dellosa was formally installed as new commanding officer of the 302nd Infantry Brigade during turnover ceremonies at the command's base in Camp Rajah Sikatuna, Katipunan, Carmen town replacing Brig. Gen. Arthur Tabaquero last Monday.

Thanks for the info :armycheers:

Updated the StarTracker accordingly

302 Inf Bde
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jedi knight
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Officers should get a star not just for their battle scars but for their role in social development

By CRISELDA YABES
Newsbreak

In a recent series of seminars on conflict management, Marine officers in Mindanao reached a consensus: the battlefield is now in the hearts and minds of people. Soldiers can no longer be mindless fighting machines but partners in social development and strengthening of governance in their communities.

Although it may not be easy to gauge the full scope of this trend in the military, this could give substance to a long-term vision of reforms spearheaded by the defense department, starting with the system of promotions in the Armed Forces.

The Philippine Defense Reform program aims to turn a military struggling with overlapping problems and inadequacies into a corporate structure of professionalism—“where you are dependent on a few good men and, despite the weakness of the organization, empower them, and make them a standard to follow,” said Rodel Cruz, who helped set up the PDR framework when he was undersecretary of defense.

And like in any corporation honing its best and brightest, the reforms have to build roadmaps for military education and to look into the promotion system.


From warriors to diplomats
About 70 percent of the requirements for promotion, from the rank of lieutenant up to full colonel, fall under a quantitative assessment of their performance against the “Order of Battle”: the body counts, the number of cleared guerrilla fronts, the amount of firearms recovered. A carry-over from the martial law era, this is how officers get their Medal of Valor or Distinguished Conduct Star medals. This is the premium they put into their careers, the incentive to get a star on their shoulder.

But since the early 1990s, there have been some changes in the parameters to give weight to the qualitative aspect of service reputation, their integrity and dedication to the job, and how they can handle stability under pressure. It also gives points to physical appearance (the current chief of staff, Gen. Alexander Yano, has made it clear that he wants his men to be in good form and shape if they want to be promoted).

Rear Admiral Emilio Marayag, who was assistant to the deputy chief of staff in charge of personnel (J-1), said the military has “the most stringent promotion system” compared to other countries in the region, so much so that “you have to be superman” to be able to skirt it.

If the promotion system is to be refined, he summarized the ideal stages of promotion for an officer: starting out as a “warrior” when he is a lieutenant up to captain, then becoming a “manager” as he reaches the senior level of lieutenant colonel, and elevated to “diplomat” when he becomes colonel.


Potentials a factor, too
From here on, Marayag explained, the promoted officers would form the “management of the elite” as it ought to be and patterned after corporations making a selection of their best men.

Being a general should take into account 50 percent of his “command estimated potential” or the ability to see things strategically, use logic and analysis, value interpersonal relationships, and have a sense of reality.

This will require the armed forces staff office for plans (J-5) to seriously re-evaluate how it measures success in the field, to determine new indicators that would capture the true picture of the peace and order situation of a given area and its social and economic climate.
“We were on that stage of planting the idea to J-5 to develop a new campaign plan [when we left the defense department],” said Cruz. “The old one can no longer be a way of measuring success and using it to promote officers. What measurement must we now use to hold a commander accountable?”


The likes of Ferrer
Cruz said the new assessment system “should be more sophisticated, and it begins with a plan of identifying elements. How do you identify the situation of ‘clear-hold-consolidate-develop’? Are there new businesses in the area? What about the attendance of schoolchildren? It does not have to be purely military!” He acknowledged that this requires policy discussion.

“If you rely on that ‘Order of Battle’ mindset, how can you measure the effectiveness of officers like Ferrer?” he said.

The former defense undersecretary was referring to Maj. Gen. Raymundo Ferrer, commander of the Army’s 6th Infantry Division whose leadership approach has been to strike a balance between the “hard” tack of launching offensives against rebels and the “soft” strategy of training his men in peace building and reaching out to the communities.

Defense Undersecretary Ernesto Carolina said the promotion system must also recognize an officer’s role in social development, not just the “body count” in the battlefield. Military units have taken on more civil-military operations, a lesson learned from fighting insurgencies for almost four decades.

Slowly steps are being taken, he said, citing the Gawad Sa Kaunlaran award for officers involved in civic action projects.


Finishing school for generals
The reforms will also establish a one-month finishing school for colonels before they are promoted to the next level of a one-star rank, a course that would “teach generals to think like generals,” Carolina said. They would delve into the subject matter of international defense, security relations, defense cooperation, and geopolitics to widen their perspective from the parochial focus on internal security operations.

The number of senior generals selected, two and three stars, is so limited at the top, usually not more than a dozen. The chief of staff holds a four-star rank and a law just passed gives him a fixed tenure of three years even if it goes beyond his retirement age of 56.

Previously, a succession of chiefs of staff had to serve a term of one year or so because retirement caught up on them and rarely did Presidents extend their duty. The revolving door system of changing leaderships limited their chances of undertaking major policies and programs.

The quota in the pyramid scale is determined by the number of soldiers—currently at 180,000 men—which in turn is determined by the budget approved by government. If, after 30 years of service, an officer has not acquired his first star, he is then forced into retirement by the rule of attrition; they call this “Up or out.”

But these proposed modifications in the promotion system are still being studied. Defense Secretary Gilberto Teodoro, who chairs the PDR board, has said that an officer who is at his best doing staff work in the headquarters does not have to be thrown in the combat field in order to fulfill his requirement for a promotion, or the other way around.

“A major challenge,” he said in an interview shortly after taking office last year, “is to get people out of the field into PDR staff jobs at the DND because it’s a disincentive for officers. They don’t get points for promotion by doing staff work. There’s a need to review the promotion system.”


Start at PMA
When the defense department was bringing the PDR wagon from camp to camp a few years ago, it discovered in its nascent stages that breeding good leaders also comes from education, molding them even before they join the service. At the premier Philippine Military Academy (PMA), where 10 percent of the armed forces officer corps come from, curriculum standards were deteriorating and the number of applicants had dropped.

Like the chiefs of staff coming and going, the superintendents of the PMA were staying for a term of at least six months only, using that position as a pit stop before getting promoted.

So in order to develop a roadmap for a better quality education and to restore PMA’s elite reputation, the matter of changing the status of the superintendent had to be done.

The institution had weakened and a leader had to stay longer, to give him enough time to effect changes and reforms and building on his successor for a continuity in maintaining a high level of standard. There were too many changes in the curriculum to suit the biases of the superintendents. A semester’s load of 20 units was too heavy. The attrition rate was too high.

Getting a superintendent to believe in a vision, he would also need an incentive to stay. The department then worked out a way in the promotion system to allow a superintendent to obtain a three-star rank while running the school for two or three years until his retirement, making his position a destination in his career. That went fairly well.


Lessen the clique’s hold
For positions higher than that, getting past the Board of Generals is currently considered an obstacle. The board is composed of the chief of staff and the chiefs of the major service commands—Army, Navy, and the Air Force. Billeting generals for positions tend to be highly personal, and it has been an unwritten practice that classmates (on the board) choose classmates (for promotion) to maintain a ruling PMA clique.

The PDR hopes to lessen this, with a civilian form of management in the defense department helping to create a better set of criteria for the sake of professionalism in the long run.

Most officers will say this is part of their culture from the academy days, but that they have gone a long way. In the time of the Marcos dictatorship, the system was worse, they say—getting a promotion was more like a “point system,” which meant that all the commander in chief had to do was to “point” to anyone to his liking regardless of rank, seniority, or merits.
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mazingu
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33 officers named to key military posts

to key positions in the Armed Forces.

Defense Secretary Gilbert Teodoro said yesterday the new appointees were passed upon by the Defense Department and the Armed Forces Board of Generals.

Leading the new appointees are Rear Adm. Danilo Cortez as Navy vice commander; Brig. Gen. Francisco Lanuza as deputy commander of the Northern Luzon Command; Commo. Mario Catacutan as chairman of the bids and awards committee; Brig. Gen. Arturo Ortiz as commander for Special Operations Command of the Army; Brig. Gen. Pedro Soria as chief of the Resource Management Office; Maj. Gen. Eduardo Oban as deputy chief of staff for Plans; Brig. Gen. Lino Horacio Lapinid as commander of the 1st Air Division of the Air Force.

Brig. Gen. Alejandro Camagay Jr. was named commander of the Air Force Reserve Command; Brig. Gen. Artemio Orozco as Air Force inspector general; Maj. Gen. Alfredo Cayton Jr. as commander of the Army’s 6th Infantry Division; Brig. Gen. Reynaldo Sealana as deputy chief of staff for Civil-Military Operations.

Col. Alex Albano was designated as commander of the Army’s 802nd Infantry Brigade, 8th Infantry Division; Col. Alan Luga, commander of the Army’s 802nd Infantry Brigade, 8th Infantry Division; Col. Roy Deveraturda, commander of the Air Force’s 570th Composite Tactical Wing; Col. Romeo Calizo, commander of the Army’s 1001st Infantry Brigade, 10th Division.

Designated as deputy commander of the Southern Luzon Command was Capt. Rosauro Arnel Gonzales Jr.; Commo. Eriberto Suria Jr., commander of the Naval Forces Eastern Mindanao; Commo. Eugenio Velasco, deputy commander of Navy’s Philippine Fleet; Capt. Zyril Carlos, commander of the Patrol Force, Philippine Fleet; Capt. Jaime Bernardino, deputy commander of the Naval Education and Training Command; Maj. Gen. Romeo Lustestica as commander of the Army’s 1st Infantry Division; Maj. Gen. Carlos Holganza as the new deputy chief of staff for Operations, J3; Brig. Gen. Anthony Alcantara as commander of the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command; Brig. Gen. Jorge Segovia, chief of the Armed Forces Command Center; and Brig. Gen. Dominador Aquino III, assistant deputy chief of staff for Operations.

The President also designated Rear Adm. Emilio Marayag as military inspector general effective Dec. 30.

Capt. George Apaga will take over as commander of the Naval Reserve Command.

Commo. Ramon Espera Jr. was designated as commandant of the Armed Forces Command & General Staff College; Commo. Orwen Cortez, commander of the Naval Forces West; and Capt. Edgardo Tamayo, commander of the Service Force of the Philippine Navy.

Officers designated as military attachés were Col. Inocencio Mayangao, United Kingdom; Col. Raul del Rosario, Vietnam; and Col. Manuel Gonzales, Thailand. Jaime Pilapil

source..
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