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The Filipino Ideology; what happened? do we really need one?
Topic Started: Mar 22 2005, 11:13 AM (3,680 Views)
shadowsniper
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The Filipino Ideology, Humanist, Democratic

After our presentation of an “Ugnayan Framework for KKK” at the University of Life,a few minutes after the First Lady Imelad Romualdez Marcos left after her brief remarks addressed to more than 800 KKK action officers, from national, regional, provincial and municipal levels, some of the participants asked us, but what is the national ideology?
There is an emergent national ideology, if by this is meant the beginning of consensus on values, theory of society, an alternative future, and a program of action that shall guide Filipinos in their individual as well as collective and social life as citizens of the Republic of the Philippines.
The writings of our national heroes, of the Propaganda Movement, those of Bonifacio and Jacinto, the ideas profounded by Mabini, by the intellectuals during the early years of American Occupation of the Philippines, the thoughts of Recto, of President Marcos (in his Today’s Revolution Democracy, Democratic Revolution in the Philippines, Notes I and Notes II, An Ideology for Filipinos) articulate the values and aspirations of the Filipino people ( the people not merely of the present, but also of the past and those still to be born.) with other nationalist intellectuals in various fields, in the academe, in the government, in private sectors, President Marcos draws from national experience, from our culture and history an emergent national ideology.
We also stress emergent, “coming to light.” And it could be described in this wise:

1. The Filipino ideology based on the egalitarian ideal, is humanist and democratic in its aspirations because it identifies with the historical struggle of the Filipinos for freedom and justice and their national liberation, and commits itself to a program of action that will promote national identity, national unity, social justice, participatory democracy, rational and honest development, freedom of belief, and adherence to the ideals of the United Nations for peace and fraternity amongst all nations and amongst all men.


2. It is an ideology that comes from our culture ( in terms of what we think and do and own), inspired by the precepts of our leaders and intellectuals as they articulate with our people a reconstruction of Philippine realities conducive to our enlightened decolonization, an ideology that shall continue to evolve together with Filipino society and with the changes in the concrete, historical and material conditions of the Filipino whose beneficient values, interests and aspirations are expressed.


3. It is an ideology that is responsive to the spiritual, intellectual and material well-being of the poorest of the working poor, serving the rebellion of the poor with a government that governs the spirit of free enterprise in the name of the people’s welfare and well-being under the regime of justice, peace, liberty and equality.


4. It is an ideology that is practical without sacrificing the nobility of idealism, purposive, single-minded and yet flexible and open, and while it is national it promotes diversity and the fulfillment of the individual’s humanity and the individual Filipino may creatively make his life and work a contribution in honor of his countrymen, his country, a gift to the world, an affirmation of life in celebration of love.


5. It is an ideology that is sustained and enriched by nationalist pride in the national identity, its ideas, values and symbols the motive force for cultural liberation, asserting the inviolable sovereignty of the people, and the Constitutional and democratic republican in its political allegiance as it enlists the concerns of a Democratic Revolution.


6. It is an ideology that inspires integrity and integration in social institutions, nurtures the most of the best in the Filipino as individual and as a community, and nourishes the meaning of the people’s sacrifices in times of crises, guiding them towards a self-fulfilling productive and creative existence.


7. It is an ideology, expressed in Isang Bansa, Isang Diwa, that endows each and every Filipino and the nation a philosophy of our history, a capacity for understanding individual and collective development, an abiding faith in the future and a commitment to the realization of our people’s dream for a better society and hopes for a spiritually meaningful life in a materially humanist world.


Because the ideology is emergent, because our leaders in the past have contributed to it, and President Marcos in the present is asking to “demystify ideology,” one way of doing this is to continue reflecting on it, and important, to practice it. In fact, to live it, heart and mind and spirit, creatively, in self-liberation, as human beings and as citizens who are Filipinos first and foremost.
It was Bonifacio who wrote: Alin pag-ibig pa, ang hihigit kaya, kaysa sa pag-ibig sa sariling lupa, wala na nga,wala.
In Today’s Revolution: Democracy (p. 83) President Marcos discusses a concern:
“ my deepest concern is with the political system that goes by the name of democracy and not in any social or economic ism which may or may not postulate a certain political order to realize its aim. I am interested in those economic and social issues which affect the exercise of freedom in society, and which, in effect, encourage or hinder free men in making the most of themselves. Mine, finally, is an anxiety over a political society that is imperiled by the fatal social disease of elevating the few over the degradation of many, caused, in turn, by deep economic and social inequalities.”


October 19, 1981


this article is taken from Filipino Ideology and the Bureaucracy by Andres Cristobal Cruz
"The important things are always simple and the simple are always hard."

LET'S GO ARMY!!!

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flipzi
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Nice research, Shadow. :thumb: :thumb:

I wonder if some from the commie side will find enough courage to tell us what they can say about this one.

:armywink:
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" People don't care what we know until they know we care. "


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Filipino ideology in the political point of view, seems to be obscured by uncertainty, with different sectors in politics cannot agree on a common standpoint of decency and sincerity. Everyone is primarily embued with ambitions to dominate the political spectrum, and some sectors resort to radicalism if their aims are not successful. Those who are already in place, embraces the principle of "Mine is mine, and yours is ours"- tantamount to greed and selfishness, making way to corruption and ripping off the people's will.

Gone are the days that our ideology is a thing we can be proud of. We can only breath a sigh of relief by putting ourselves backward by scanning the books of history during the times of Jose Rizal, Andres Bonifacio, and other heroes in our great hall of fame.

In the economic point of view, we should have a sound economy as Filipinos are hard workers and the country has a vast quantity of natural resources, but still we are struggling hard to survive because our moral ideology has been tainted with corruption.
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we dont have filipino ideology, ehat we have is american ideology or any other foreign ideology...
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The culprit here is the failure of the govt to emphasize what it is!

It is never too late to start doing it right though.

The govt through the DepEd should start inculcating this idelogy into our youth's minds.

These ideology and values enhancement program must also be included in the collegiate curriculum.
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" Sovereignty resides in the people and all government authority emanates from them! - Art. II Sec 1, Philippine Constitution "


" People don't care what we know until they know we care. "


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With the proliferation of different religious denomination, cults, sexual orientation or preferences and political organizations with different agendas we could no longer pinpoint the sticking point of our own ideology hence there is nothing in sight to mould to make it as a basis or foundation to educate the next generation about our own ideology.

It remains a myth.
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FILIPINO VALUES: NATURE, CONSTELLATION

AND CONTEXT

What are Filipino values? What is distinctly Filipino in our value system? The Filipino value system arises from our culture or way of life, our distinctive way of becoming human in this particular place and time. We speak of Filipino values in a fourfold sense.

First, although mankind shares universal human values, it is obvious that certain values take on for us a distinctively Filipino flavor. The Greek ideal of moderation or meden agan, the Roman in medio stat virtus, the Confucian and Buddhist "doctrine of the Middle", find their Filipino equivalent in hindi labis, hindi kulang, katamtaman lamang.

Secondly, when we speak of Filipino values, we do not mean that elements of these Filipino values are absent in the value systems of other peoples and cultures. All people eat, talk and sing, but they eat different foods, speak various languages and sing different songs. Thus, we easily recognize Filipino, American, Chinese, Japanese or any other foreign food, language or music. The difference lies in the way these elements are ranked, combined or emphasized so that they take on a distinctively Filipino slant or cast. For instance, in China, honesty and hard work may rank highest; Chinese and Japanese cultures give great value to politeness and beauty; American culture to promptness and efficiency; and Filipino culture to trust in God and family centeredness. In this sense of value-ranking and priority of values, we can speak of dominant Filipino values.

Thirdly, universal human values in a Filipino context (historical, cultural, socio-economic, political, moral and religious) take on a distinctive set of Filipino meanings and motivations. This is true not only of the aims and goals, beliefs, convictions, and social principles of the traditional value system of the lowland rural family(4) but also of what Fr. Horacio de la Costa, S.J. calls the Filipino "nationalistic" tradition (pagsasarili, pagkakaisa, pakikisama, pakikipagkapwa-tao, and pagkabayani.(5)

A Filipino value or disvalue does not exist alone, in isolation or in a vacuum. Filipino values like bahala na, utang na loob, hiya, pakikisama, pakiusap are clustered around core values like social acceptance, economic security, social mobility, and are always found in a definite context or set of circumstances. Both positive values and negative disvalues together form a characteristic constellation in school (aralan at dasalan [studying and praying], kuwentuhan at laruan [story telling and game], inggitan at tsismisan [envying and gossiping]), which differs from the configuration found in government offices (pagkakaisa [unity] , pagkabayani [heroism], intriga [intrigue], palakasan [show of power], sipsipan [bribery], palusot), in business firms (palabra de honor [word of honor], delicadeza [finesse], "commission", "kickback", padulas [grease money], lagay [bribe]), or in the barrio barangays (paggalang [honoring], pagdadamayan [comforting], bayanihan [cooperation], bahala na [come what may], utang na loob [gratefulness], hiya[shame]/pakiusap[appear], palakasan [show of power]). To change a framework of values, it may be necessary to change the constellation and context of those negative values that hinder Filipino and Christian development.

Fourthly, we can speak of Filipino values in the sense that the historical consciousness of values has evolved among our people. The Filipino concept of justice has evolved from inequality to equality, and to human dignity; from the tribe, to the family, and to the nation(6). Filipino consciousness of these different values varies at different periods of our history. It is only in the last two decades that the Filipino people have become more conscious of overpopulation and family planning, environmental pollution (Kawasaki sintering plant) and wildlife conservation (Calauit Island), and the violation of human rights (Martial Law), active non-violence and People Power (1986 non-violent Revolution).

FILIPINO VALUES: AMBIVALENCE AND

SPLIT-LEVEL CHRISTIANITY

Are Filipino values good or bad? The truth is that Filipino values are ambivalent in the sense that they are a potential for good or evil, a help or hindrance to personal and national development, depending on how they are understood, practiced or lived. They can be used in a good or evil context, e.g., pakikisama sa kabuktutan or sa kaunlaran. Filipino values have both positive and negative aspects depending on the context in which they are found. In a social system or atmosphere of extreme insecurity, the positive qualities of the Filipino take on negative and ugly appearances. For example, utang na loob can lead to pakiusap, nepotism and "cronyism". Pagmamay-ari ng kapangyarihan (the possession of power) and their abuse could lead to class distinction or the "malakas-mahina system". Hiya can become pakitang tao or gaya-gaya; machismo (tunay na lalake) is partly responsible for the "querida system" and the doble kara morality.

To show the ambivalence of Filipino values, one example will suffice. Take the well known but ambivalent Filipino bahala na mentality. On the one hand, this Filipino attitude could be the root of the positive value of risk taking, entrepreneurship, and social responsibility. Prof. Jose de Mesa, in a pioneer book on the Filipino and Christian meaning of bahala na, stresses the positive meaning of this virtue of risk- taking, enterprise and joint trust in both human effort (bahala tayong lahat) and divine Providence (bahala ang Maykapal)(7). A people's will to take chances and risks, no matter what difficulties and problems the future entails, is necessary for a nation's growth and destiny. Bahala na could be a genuine faith and trust in Divine Providence that also presupposes a self-reliance (pagsasarili) that took the form of People Power in the EDSA revolution. Bahala na was a positive and nationalistic virtue for Jose Rizal, who believed that Filipinos could no longer rely on the Spaniards, but only on themselves and on God.

On the other hand, in the past the negative aspect of bahala

na which dominated Filipino life meant a false sense of resignation (ganyan lang ang buhay), a superstitious belief or blind faith (malas/suwerte, tadhana, kapalaran), or escape from decision-making and social responsibility. As such it may be the root cause of national apathy (walang pakialam) and collective paralysis of action (bakit pa kikilos) to solve both local and national problems. Everything is already predetermined or fated. Negatively, bahala na could engender a false sense of security with God as insurance or a security blanket. For example, if God wants Filipino families to have plenty of children (anak ay kayamanan), God will take care of everything. Bahala na could be the cause of the absence of national initiative and of that discipline required for national growth. When negative bahala na prevails, nothing ever gets done. Potholed roads, uncollected garbage, countless unsolved murders, carnaping and smuggling remain year after year. How many have ever been arrested, convicted or jailed for wanton murder or for notorious graft and corruption? A sense of national frustration, helplessness, and despair grips the nation and the people no longer care. Nothing is going to happen--Bahala na, come what may.

From a Filipino perspective, what social reforms are necessary to transform bahala na positively? No society will long endure unless there is justice; that is, unless a system of reward and punishment exists and is effective. If in Philippine society lying and stealing people's money are rewarded and truthfulness and honesty are punished, what else can one expect but a badly broken political will for national reform? The present government should therefore prioritize an effective system of universal sanctions for those who hold power. From a Christian perspective, the Christian doctrines of divine Providence, creation, stewardship of land and property, and the conservation of our natural resources remain the challenge and task of parents, educators, and Christian evangelizers.

Split-level Christianity or double-standard morality, the immorality and hypocrisy of many so-called Filipino Christians, is a scandal to both Christians and non-Christians alike.(8) It is important to distinguish between pseudo Christianity in all its varied forms and authentic Christianity; between bad and good Christians. We must also take into account the ambiguity of any religious commitment, which is not something made once and for all, but a life-long process which demands constant conversion and renewal. We must also distinguish between Filipino actual and normative behaviour (between what is and what ought to be). Filipino values are not static, i.e., they are not simply what they are, but dynamic, i.e., they become. From a historical perspective, the question to ask about Filipino values is: Ganito kami noon: paano kayo ngayon? How are we to know towards what goal or direction Filipino values ought to move or become?

Now that we have regained our democratic form of government once again and have arrived at a privileged historical kairos, how do we transform Filipino values to build a more "just and humane society" (Preamble, 1987 Constitution)? We need both external structural and internal cultural change. It is here that the Christian faith should, in the last analysis, point the way to the kind of values education needed for national reconstruction.

Ateneo de Manila University

Manila
http://www.crvp.org/book/Series03/III-7/chapter_vi.htm
"The important things are always simple and the simple are always hard."

LET'S GO ARMY!!!

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Bonifacio's Will to National Liberation

He remains to this day enigmatic for unlike the national hero, Jose Rizal, this plebeian-born leader organized the radical Kataas-taasang Kagalang-galangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan (the K.K.K.) and called for no less than separation from mother Spain.

He has not as many statues in the public plazas of the country as Rizal, and neither are there as many streets named after him as for the ohters in the Propaganda Movement. Rizal has a province named after him although he was born in Laguna. There has yet to be a Bonifacio province as there is a Quirino province. There is a Quezon and even an Aurora province.

The largest and most beautiful monument to him is miles away from the site where in August of 1896 he tore his cedula as hundred other ordinary Filipinos followed him to signify freedom from the bondage to another country. Yet it is to a small Liwasang Bonifacio in front of the now more efficent Bureau of Posts that sometimes the masses of our people gather , make their full denunciations of imagined or real wrongs and shout grievances and sing Ang Bayan Ko while the statue of Bonifacio (cast in concrete and plaster since the Villegas administration lacked funds to have the Guillermo Tolentino statue cast in bronze) faces the "lagusnilad" and the LRT overhead and beyond.

What we have come to learn more about Andres Bonifacio is from the book of Teodoro A. Agoncillo, The Revolt of the Masses: The Story of Bonifacio and the Katipunan (1956) and from what Claro M. Recto wrote about Rizal and Bonifacio - Who is the Dreamer and who is the Realist or something to that effect anyway.

It was on July 7, 1892 that Bonifacio, Valentin Diaz, Teodoro Plata, Ladislao Diwa, Deodato Arellano and others organized the KKK in the house along Azcarraga and Elcano Street. It had three objectives: political, moral and civic. This is much like the objectives of the Filipino ideology being espoused by President Marcos: political liberation, economic emancipation and social concord. The KKK was separatist. It was humanistic in its aim: the economic objective of self-reliance and self-help, the defense of the oppressed and less fortunate. It was moral in social orientation , teaching good manners, respect for elders and authority and love of God as also the love of country and people. Bonifacio's membership in freemasonry being member of lodge Taliba and in the La Liga Filipina of Rizal trhe organization meeting of which he attended, provided him a structure for the organization of KKK even as he read of the French Revolution and its struggle for liberty, equality and fraternity. A "Camara Negra" or black chamber composed by Bonifacio, Valenzuela and Emilio Jacinto sentenced and punished Katipuneros who betrayed secrets.

Like freemasonry, the KKK had grades for different kinds of members: Katipon, first grade, Kawal, second grade, Bayani, third grade.The hoods for memberswere black, green and red respectively. The main password was Rizalwhose exile to Dapitan had occasioned the organization of KKK which had a woman's chapter composed of wives, daughters and sisters of Katipunan members. The KKK had its own newspaper, Kalayaan with Marcelo H Del Pilar appearing as editor but managed by Emilio Jacinto with Faustino Duque and Ulpiano Fernandez as assistants. Its first issue of two thousands copies was published Januray 18, 1896 but was off the press and dated March, 1896 showing difficulties of a clandestine newspaper. "Agapito Bagumbayan" was Bonifacio's pen-name. The first issue was to be its last issue. Hardlyhad Jacinto prepared the pages when the printing press was raided, but not before his assistants already destroyed the press.

Those wo wanted to become members of the KKK are told of the purposes of the organization in Tagalog pamphlets to the end that they may not " in the future, repent and so that they may perform their duties voluntarily." This is an orientational phase which lays down the ideological premises of the KKK.

The objective of the KKK, the pamphlet says, is grave and noble: by means of an oath of commitment to unify the hearts and minds of Filipinos they could tear the black veil that blinds the intelligence and in order that the true road to Reason and Enlightenment may be attained.

In KKK one of the first rules is love of country and mutual help,

In KKK all, rich, poor, ignorant and wise are equal and true brethen.

Those who become members are forced to abandon their deplorablehabits and submit themselves to the commandments, the Decalogue of the Katipunan.

In KKK all acts contrary to a noble and clean life are repugnant.

The applicant who cannot do something must desist from joining. No matter how good a speaker may be, only his acts and deeds are taken into account.

There is admonition and warning that membership carries difficult responsibilities; failures and betrayals are given terrible punishment.

He will not be admmited who desires only a life of ease and comfort beacuse the KKK is commtied to protection of the oppressed and the unremitting struggle against evil. This is because of the misfortunes and sufferings of the Filipinos who are made to endure inhuman cruelties, injustices and abues.

And because money is needed. " which today is one of the principal means that is considered necessary for the sustenance of all" dues must be paid promptly.

The entrance fee to the KKK is one peso. The monthly fee is twelve and a half-centavo. The KKK funds cannot be spent without the consent of the majority.

So before the applicants become candidates to the first grade Katipon, they must give serious thought to the tasks, responsibilities to the KKK and to its objectives which cannot be carried out by " him who has no true love for his country and no genuine desire to protect what is good."

The readings of the Katipunan include Bonifacio's Pag-ibig sa Tinubuang Lupa, Katapusang Hibik ng Pilipinas sa Inang Espanya, Mga Dapat Mabatid ng mga Tagalog, and his translation of Rizal's Mi Ultimo Adios and Jacinto's Pahayag and Kartilya ng KKK and Liwanag at Dilim.

We translated the Decalogue of the KKK written by Bonifacio and we found it as relevant today as it was to the thousands of Filipino who in 1896 began the first national war of liberation against a foreign colonial power in Asia- through its instrument, the people's organization, the great Katipunan.
Bonifacio, founder of KKK was devoured by the Revolution he launched. He died wiht his brother Procopio in the hands of those who were given orders to execute them for alleged treason and subversion. A recall of the orders came too late.

November 8, 1893

this article is taken from Filipino Ideology and the Bureaucracy by Andres Cristobal Cruz

"The important things are always simple and the simple are always hard."

LET'S GO ARMY!!!

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The objective of the KKK, the pamphlet says, is grave and noble: by means of an oath of commitment to unify the hearts and minds of Filipinos they could tear the black veil that blinds the intelligence and in order that the true road to Reason and Enlightenment may be attained.

In KKK one of the first rules is love of country and mutual help,

In KKK all, rich, poor, ignorant and wise are equal and true brethen.

Those who become members are forced to abandon their deplorablehabits and submit themselves to the commandments, the Decalogue of the Katipunan.

In KKK all acts contrary to a noble and clean life are repugnant.

The applicant who cannot do something must desist from joining. No matter how good a speaker may be, only his acts and deeds are taken into account.

There is admonition and warning that membership carries difficult responsibilities; failures and betrayals are given terrible punishment.



I cannot recall witnessing any of our teachers, back in my schooldays from kinder to college, tackle any of these!

I believe the govt thru DepEd should redraft the way they teach history in all our schools.

DAPAT BATA PA LANG AY MAY ALAM NA KUNG ANU ANG KULAY NG ISANG BAYANI O TUNAY NA MAKABAYAN.
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With this modern society trends, learning our own ideology is somewhat at the back of all priorities because we are besieged and sorrounded by economic difficulties and political upheaval.

The only slogan that respects ideology is; "I AM A PILIPINO", but I don't know why, and how I became one.
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